Use of the Escherichia coli SSB gene to prevent bioreactor takeover by plasmidless cells

Ronald D. Porter, Stuart Black, Sachin Pannuri, Alfred Carlson

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Reactor takeover by plasmidless cells is a major problem encountered when producing proteins from plasmid-borne genes in genetically engineered bacteria. We have approached this problem by deleting the essential ssb gene from the Escherichia coli chromosome and placing it on a plasmid. Plasmidless cells do not accumulate even after growing such strains under non-selective continuous culture conditions for extended periods of time. Other ssb-containing plasmids can be readily introduced into this E. coli strain by a plasmid-displacement technique. Using this system, we have achieved very high levels of β-lactamase production in continuous culture without selective pressure.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)47-53
Number of pages7
JournalNature Biotechnology
Volume8
Issue number1
StatePublished - Jan 1 1990

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Bioreactors
Escherichia coli
Plasmids
Genes
Chromosomes
Bacteria
Proteins
Essential Genes

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Biotechnology
  • Bioengineering
  • Applied Microbiology and Biotechnology
  • Molecular Medicine
  • Biomedical Engineering

Cite this

Porter, R. D., Black, S., Pannuri, S., & Carlson, A. (1990). Use of the Escherichia coli SSB gene to prevent bioreactor takeover by plasmidless cells. Nature Biotechnology, 8(1), 47-53.
Porter, Ronald D. ; Black, Stuart ; Pannuri, Sachin ; Carlson, Alfred. / Use of the Escherichia coli SSB gene to prevent bioreactor takeover by plasmidless cells. In: Nature Biotechnology. 1990 ; Vol. 8, No. 1. pp. 47-53.
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Porter, RD, Black, S, Pannuri, S & Carlson, A 1990, 'Use of the Escherichia coli SSB gene to prevent bioreactor takeover by plasmidless cells', Nature Biotechnology, vol. 8, no. 1, pp. 47-53.

Use of the Escherichia coli SSB gene to prevent bioreactor takeover by plasmidless cells. / Porter, Ronald D.; Black, Stuart; Pannuri, Sachin; Carlson, Alfred.

In: Nature Biotechnology, Vol. 8, No. 1, 01.01.1990, p. 47-53.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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