Using a high probability command sequence to increase classroom compliance: The role of behavioral momentum

Phillip J. Belfiore, Sarah Pulley Basile, David Lee

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

21 Scopus citations

Abstract

One of the most problematic behaviors in children with developmental disabilities is noncompliance. Although behavioral research has provided strategies to impact noncompliance, oftentimes the methodologies are consequent techniques, which may not be conducive to implementation by the classroom teacher. In this teacher-designed and implemented study, a sequence of high-probability instructional commands preceded the targeted low-probability command, in an attempt to increase compliance to the low-probability command. Results, discussed within the body of behavioral momentum research, showed an increase in compliance to low-probability classroom commands for a seven year-old student with moderate mental retardation and Down Syndrome. Results are discussed as (a) an effective, antecedent approach to classroom compliance and (b) re-connecting the gap between applied behavioral research and experimentally controlled classroom practice.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)160-171
Number of pages12
JournalJournal of Behavioral Education
Volume17
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - Jun 1 2008

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Education
  • Developmental and Educational Psychology

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