Using algae and other biomass for H2 production in a modified microbial fuel cell process: A bioelectrochemically assisted microbial reactor

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

Abstract

Biological hydrogen production using photosynthetic algae and bacteria can result in the generation of large amounts of waste biomass. This biomass can be used to produce hydrogen gas by modifying microbial fuel cell (MFC) technologies to produce hydrogen instead of electricity. By applying a small voltage (0.25 V in practice), it is possible to generate pure hydrogen gas at the cathode in this modified MFC process known as a bioelectrochemically assisted microbial reactor (BEAMR). Using the BEAMR process we have produced ~3 mol-H 2/mol-acetate. Linking this process with fermentation of sugars could produce 8-9 mol-H2/molglucose, at an energy equivalent of one mole of hydrogen. The process is not limited to sugars, as any biodegradable organic matter can be used, such as domestic wastewater and steam-exploded corn stover hydrolysates. Thus, it should be possible to link the BEAMR process with photosynthetic biohydrogen production in the form of algae, bacteria or crops, to create an overall sustainable biohydrogen process.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Title of host publication16th World Hydrogen Energy Conference 2006, WHEC 2006
Pages3461-3464
Number of pages4
StatePublished - Dec 1 2006
Event16th World Hydrogen Energy Conference 2006, WHEC 2006 - Lyon, France
Duration: Jun 13 2006Jun 16 2006

Publication series

Name16th World Hydrogen Energy Conference 2006, WHEC 2006
Volume4

Other

Other16th World Hydrogen Energy Conference 2006, WHEC 2006
CountryFrance
CityLyon
Period6/13/066/16/06

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Energy Engineering and Power Technology
  • Fuel Technology

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