Using an approximation to the Euclidean skeleton for efficient collision detection and tissue deformations in surgical simulators

Roger Webster, Matt Harris, Rod Shenk, John Blumenstock, Jesse Gerber, Chad Billman, Aaron Benson, Randy Haluck

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

3 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

This paper describes a technique for efficient collision detection and deformation of abdominal organs in surgical simulation using an approximation of the Euclidean skeleton. Many researchers have developed surgical simulators, but one of the most difficult underlying problems is that of organ-instrument collision detection followed by the deformation of the tissue caused by the instrument. Much of the difficulty is due to the vast number of polygons in high resolution complex organ models. A high resolution gall bladder model for instance can number in the tens of thousands of polygons. Our methodology utilizes the reduction power of the skeleton to reduce computations. First, we recursively compute approximations to the Euclidean skeleton to generate a set of skeletal points for the organ. Then we pre-compute for each vertex in each polygon the associated skeleton point (minimal distance discs). A spring is then connected from each vertex to its associated skeleton point to be used in the deformation algorithm. The data structure for the organ thus stores for each skeletal point its maximum and minimum distances and the list of associated vertices. A heuristic algorithm using the skeleton structure of the instrument and the skeleton of the organ is used to determine instrument collisions with the organ.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Title of host publicationMedicine Meets Virtual Reality 13
Subtitle of host publicationThe Magical Next Becomes the Medical Now, MMVR 2005
PublisherIOS Press
Pages596-598
Number of pages3
ISBN (Print)1586034987, 9781586034986
StatePublished - Jan 1 2005
Event13th Annual Conference on Medicine Meets Virtual Reality: The Magical Next Becomes the Medical Now, MMVR 2005 - Long Beach, CA, United States
Duration: Jan 26 2005Jan 29 2005

Publication series

NameStudies in Health Technology and Informatics
Volume111
ISSN (Print)0926-9630
ISSN (Electronic)1879-8365

Other

Other13th Annual Conference on Medicine Meets Virtual Reality: The Magical Next Becomes the Medical Now, MMVR 2005
CountryUnited States
CityLong Beach, CA
Period1/26/051/29/05

Fingerprint

Skeleton
Simulators
Tissue
Heuristic algorithms
Data structures
Urinary Bladder
Research Personnel

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Biomedical Engineering
  • Health Informatics
  • Health Information Management

Cite this

Webster, R., Harris, M., Shenk, R., Blumenstock, J., Gerber, J., Billman, C., ... Haluck, R. (2005). Using an approximation to the Euclidean skeleton for efficient collision detection and tissue deformations in surgical simulators. In Medicine Meets Virtual Reality 13: The Magical Next Becomes the Medical Now, MMVR 2005 (pp. 596-598). (Studies in Health Technology and Informatics; Vol. 111). IOS Press.
Webster, Roger ; Harris, Matt ; Shenk, Rod ; Blumenstock, John ; Gerber, Jesse ; Billman, Chad ; Benson, Aaron ; Haluck, Randy. / Using an approximation to the Euclidean skeleton for efficient collision detection and tissue deformations in surgical simulators. Medicine Meets Virtual Reality 13: The Magical Next Becomes the Medical Now, MMVR 2005. IOS Press, 2005. pp. 596-598 (Studies in Health Technology and Informatics).
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Webster, R, Harris, M, Shenk, R, Blumenstock, J, Gerber, J, Billman, C, Benson, A & Haluck, R 2005, Using an approximation to the Euclidean skeleton for efficient collision detection and tissue deformations in surgical simulators. in Medicine Meets Virtual Reality 13: The Magical Next Becomes the Medical Now, MMVR 2005. Studies in Health Technology and Informatics, vol. 111, IOS Press, pp. 596-598, 13th Annual Conference on Medicine Meets Virtual Reality: The Magical Next Becomes the Medical Now, MMVR 2005, Long Beach, CA, United States, 1/26/05.

Using an approximation to the Euclidean skeleton for efficient collision detection and tissue deformations in surgical simulators. / Webster, Roger; Harris, Matt; Shenk, Rod; Blumenstock, John; Gerber, Jesse; Billman, Chad; Benson, Aaron; Haluck, Randy.

Medicine Meets Virtual Reality 13: The Magical Next Becomes the Medical Now, MMVR 2005. IOS Press, 2005. p. 596-598 (Studies in Health Technology and Informatics; Vol. 111).

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

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Webster R, Harris M, Shenk R, Blumenstock J, Gerber J, Billman C et al. Using an approximation to the Euclidean skeleton for efficient collision detection and tissue deformations in surgical simulators. In Medicine Meets Virtual Reality 13: The Magical Next Becomes the Medical Now, MMVR 2005. IOS Press. 2005. p. 596-598. (Studies in Health Technology and Informatics).