Using electronic surveys in organizational/employee communication research: A study at GE's Global Research Center

Joe R. Downing, Russell S. Clark

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

5 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

This study explores methodological issues that communication scholars and practitioners face when administering electronic surveys within for-profit organizations. In 2000, the researchers conducted a series of three cross-sectional studies within General Electric's (GE) Global Research Center. The Center is located in Niskayuna, NY. An equivalent version of a communication survey was administered electronically to a random stratified sample of GE employees three times that year. Each employee sample was subject to a different survey intervention: no intervention, follow-up reminder email only, and leader pre-announcement email plus a follow-up reminder. The researchers also recorded how long it took respondents to return their surveys. The highest response rate (41%) occurred in the third intervention. Across the three administrations, 465 GE employees completed the surveys; 98% of respondents returned their surveys electronically rather than printing out their responses and sending them to the researcher by postal mail. The article concludes with implications and suggestions for those who administer electronic surveys within organizations.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)249-262
Number of pages14
JournalIEEE Transactions on Professional Communication
Volume50
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - Dec 1 2007

Fingerprint

Personnel
Communication
Electronic mail
Employee communications
Research center
Printing
Profitability
General Electric
Employees

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Industrial relations
  • Electrical and Electronic Engineering

Cite this

@article{beeb417c7e85468a974cfc3fde4d7a84,
title = "Using electronic surveys in organizational/employee communication research: A study at GE's Global Research Center",
abstract = "This study explores methodological issues that communication scholars and practitioners face when administering electronic surveys within for-profit organizations. In 2000, the researchers conducted a series of three cross-sectional studies within General Electric's (GE) Global Research Center. The Center is located in Niskayuna, NY. An equivalent version of a communication survey was administered electronically to a random stratified sample of GE employees three times that year. Each employee sample was subject to a different survey intervention: no intervention, follow-up reminder email only, and leader pre-announcement email plus a follow-up reminder. The researchers also recorded how long it took respondents to return their surveys. The highest response rate (41{\%}) occurred in the third intervention. Across the three administrations, 465 GE employees completed the surveys; 98{\%} of respondents returned their surveys electronically rather than printing out their responses and sending them to the researcher by postal mail. The article concludes with implications and suggestions for those who administer electronic surveys within organizations.",
author = "Downing, {Joe R.} and Clark, {Russell S.}",
year = "2007",
month = "12",
day = "1",
doi = "10.1109/TPC.2007.902826",
language = "English (US)",
volume = "50",
pages = "249--262",
journal = "IEEE Transactions on Professional Communication",
issn = "0099-9474",
publisher = "Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers Inc.",
number = "3",

}

Using electronic surveys in organizational/employee communication research : A study at GE's Global Research Center. / Downing, Joe R.; Clark, Russell S.

In: IEEE Transactions on Professional Communication, Vol. 50, No. 3, 01.12.2007, p. 249-262.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

TY - JOUR

T1 - Using electronic surveys in organizational/employee communication research

T2 - A study at GE's Global Research Center

AU - Downing, Joe R.

AU - Clark, Russell S.

PY - 2007/12/1

Y1 - 2007/12/1

N2 - This study explores methodological issues that communication scholars and practitioners face when administering electronic surveys within for-profit organizations. In 2000, the researchers conducted a series of three cross-sectional studies within General Electric's (GE) Global Research Center. The Center is located in Niskayuna, NY. An equivalent version of a communication survey was administered electronically to a random stratified sample of GE employees three times that year. Each employee sample was subject to a different survey intervention: no intervention, follow-up reminder email only, and leader pre-announcement email plus a follow-up reminder. The researchers also recorded how long it took respondents to return their surveys. The highest response rate (41%) occurred in the third intervention. Across the three administrations, 465 GE employees completed the surveys; 98% of respondents returned their surveys electronically rather than printing out their responses and sending them to the researcher by postal mail. The article concludes with implications and suggestions for those who administer electronic surveys within organizations.

AB - This study explores methodological issues that communication scholars and practitioners face when administering electronic surveys within for-profit organizations. In 2000, the researchers conducted a series of three cross-sectional studies within General Electric's (GE) Global Research Center. The Center is located in Niskayuna, NY. An equivalent version of a communication survey was administered electronically to a random stratified sample of GE employees three times that year. Each employee sample was subject to a different survey intervention: no intervention, follow-up reminder email only, and leader pre-announcement email plus a follow-up reminder. The researchers also recorded how long it took respondents to return their surveys. The highest response rate (41%) occurred in the third intervention. Across the three administrations, 465 GE employees completed the surveys; 98% of respondents returned their surveys electronically rather than printing out their responses and sending them to the researcher by postal mail. The article concludes with implications and suggestions for those who administer electronic surveys within organizations.

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=65449139209&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=65449139209&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1109/TPC.2007.902826

DO - 10.1109/TPC.2007.902826

M3 - Article

AN - SCOPUS:65449139209

VL - 50

SP - 249

EP - 262

JO - IEEE Transactions on Professional Communication

JF - IEEE Transactions on Professional Communication

SN - 0099-9474

IS - 3

ER -