Using electronic/computer interventions to promote physical activity

B. H. Marcus, J. T. Ciccolo, C. N. Sciamanna

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

61 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

The internet has been used as a method to deliver various health interventions (eg, weight management, smoking cessation, increasing physical activity). An electronic search (ie, PubMed, PsycInfo, Web of Science) for internet-based physical activity interventions among adults yields fewer than 25 studies. Although many have considered physical activity as one element of a multifactorial behavioural intervention, few have focused exclusively on changing sedentary behaviour. Overall, current results are encouraging and it appears that response to an internet-based physical activity intervention is similar to response to other more established, effective interventions. Given that primary care referrals for physical activity are successful in changing sedentary behaviour to some extent, there is an urgent need for investigations into the effect of using an internet-based physical activity programme within the context of primary care. Although no studies that have combined an established internet-based physical activity programme with primary care were found, there is evidence that significant progress would probably be made by providing clinicians with information on internet-based physical activity programmes.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)102-105
Number of pages4
JournalBritish journal of sports medicine
Volume43
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - Feb 1 2009

Fingerprint

Internet
Primary Health Care
Smoking Cessation
PubMed
Referral and Consultation
Weights and Measures
Health

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Orthopedics and Sports Medicine
  • Physical Therapy, Sports Therapy and Rehabilitation

Cite this

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Using electronic/computer interventions to promote physical activity. / Marcus, B. H.; Ciccolo, J. T.; Sciamanna, C. N.

In: British journal of sports medicine, Vol. 43, No. 2, 01.02.2009, p. 102-105.

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

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