Using fish biomarkers to monitor improvements in environmental quality

Douglas E. Facey, Vicki Suzette Blazer, Meredith M. Gasper, Cynthia L. Turcotte

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

28 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

The percentage of splenic tissue occupied by macrophage aggregates and hepatosomatic index (HSI) were evaluated in rock bass Ambloplites rupestris from Burlington Harbor, Vermont. In 1992, fish collected from the inner Burlington Harbor area had a significantly greater percentage of splenic tissue occupied by macrophage aggregates and greater HSI than did fish from reference sites. These biomarkers often are correlated with exposure to various contaminants (e.g., polychlorinated biphenyls, polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons, and some heavy metals, which were found in Burlington Harbor sediments during surveys in 1990 and 1991). Contaminants are believed to have entered Burlington Harbor through the city's main sewage treatment plant, which discharged effluent into the harbor for many years. In 1994, the city completed a significant upgrade of this treatment plant, which included an extension of the effluent pipe beyond the inner harbor area. In 1999, rock bass were again collected from Burlington Harbor as an index of whether there was any improvement in environmental quality. Our data showed a significantly lower percentage of splenic tissue occupied by macrophage aggregates and significantly lower HSI among nine age-4 rock bass in 1999 than among six age-4 rock bass in 1992. The significant changes in these biomarkers suggest decreased exposure to contaminants. Our study reinforces the value of macrophage aggregates and HSI as biomarkers of environmental contamination, and the correlation with remedial action shows their potential utility in documenting improvements in environmental conditions.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)263-266
Number of pages4
JournalJournal of Aquatic Animal Health
Volume17
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - Sep 1 2005

Fingerprint

environmental quality
hepatosomatic index
biomarker
biomarkers
cell aggregates
harbor
macrophages
fish
effluents
rock
pollutant
sewage treatment
polychlorinated biphenyls
polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons
pipes
effluent
heavy metals
pollution
Ambloplites rupestris
sediments

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Aquatic Science

Cite this

Facey, D. E., Blazer, V. S., Gasper, M. M., & Turcotte, C. L. (2005). Using fish biomarkers to monitor improvements in environmental quality. Journal of Aquatic Animal Health, 17(3), 263-266. https://doi.org/10.1577/H04-055.1
Facey, Douglas E. ; Blazer, Vicki Suzette ; Gasper, Meredith M. ; Turcotte, Cynthia L. / Using fish biomarkers to monitor improvements in environmental quality. In: Journal of Aquatic Animal Health. 2005 ; Vol. 17, No. 3. pp. 263-266.
@article{00b92cd5e0c1499289d3053ca0947e9f,
title = "Using fish biomarkers to monitor improvements in environmental quality",
abstract = "The percentage of splenic tissue occupied by macrophage aggregates and hepatosomatic index (HSI) were evaluated in rock bass Ambloplites rupestris from Burlington Harbor, Vermont. In 1992, fish collected from the inner Burlington Harbor area had a significantly greater percentage of splenic tissue occupied by macrophage aggregates and greater HSI than did fish from reference sites. These biomarkers often are correlated with exposure to various contaminants (e.g., polychlorinated biphenyls, polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons, and some heavy metals, which were found in Burlington Harbor sediments during surveys in 1990 and 1991). Contaminants are believed to have entered Burlington Harbor through the city's main sewage treatment plant, which discharged effluent into the harbor for many years. In 1994, the city completed a significant upgrade of this treatment plant, which included an extension of the effluent pipe beyond the inner harbor area. In 1999, rock bass were again collected from Burlington Harbor as an index of whether there was any improvement in environmental quality. Our data showed a significantly lower percentage of splenic tissue occupied by macrophage aggregates and significantly lower HSI among nine age-4 rock bass in 1999 than among six age-4 rock bass in 1992. The significant changes in these biomarkers suggest decreased exposure to contaminants. Our study reinforces the value of macrophage aggregates and HSI as biomarkers of environmental contamination, and the correlation with remedial action shows their potential utility in documenting improvements in environmental conditions.",
author = "Facey, {Douglas E.} and Blazer, {Vicki Suzette} and Gasper, {Meredith M.} and Turcotte, {Cynthia L.}",
year = "2005",
month = "9",
day = "1",
doi = "10.1577/H04-055.1",
language = "English (US)",
volume = "17",
pages = "263--266",
journal = "Journal of Aquatic Animal Health",
issn = "0899-7659",
publisher = "American Fisheries Society",
number = "3",

}

Facey, DE, Blazer, VS, Gasper, MM & Turcotte, CL 2005, 'Using fish biomarkers to monitor improvements in environmental quality', Journal of Aquatic Animal Health, vol. 17, no. 3, pp. 263-266. https://doi.org/10.1577/H04-055.1

Using fish biomarkers to monitor improvements in environmental quality. / Facey, Douglas E.; Blazer, Vicki Suzette; Gasper, Meredith M.; Turcotte, Cynthia L.

In: Journal of Aquatic Animal Health, Vol. 17, No. 3, 01.09.2005, p. 263-266.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

TY - JOUR

T1 - Using fish biomarkers to monitor improvements in environmental quality

AU - Facey, Douglas E.

AU - Blazer, Vicki Suzette

AU - Gasper, Meredith M.

AU - Turcotte, Cynthia L.

PY - 2005/9/1

Y1 - 2005/9/1

N2 - The percentage of splenic tissue occupied by macrophage aggregates and hepatosomatic index (HSI) were evaluated in rock bass Ambloplites rupestris from Burlington Harbor, Vermont. In 1992, fish collected from the inner Burlington Harbor area had a significantly greater percentage of splenic tissue occupied by macrophage aggregates and greater HSI than did fish from reference sites. These biomarkers often are correlated with exposure to various contaminants (e.g., polychlorinated biphenyls, polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons, and some heavy metals, which were found in Burlington Harbor sediments during surveys in 1990 and 1991). Contaminants are believed to have entered Burlington Harbor through the city's main sewage treatment plant, which discharged effluent into the harbor for many years. In 1994, the city completed a significant upgrade of this treatment plant, which included an extension of the effluent pipe beyond the inner harbor area. In 1999, rock bass were again collected from Burlington Harbor as an index of whether there was any improvement in environmental quality. Our data showed a significantly lower percentage of splenic tissue occupied by macrophage aggregates and significantly lower HSI among nine age-4 rock bass in 1999 than among six age-4 rock bass in 1992. The significant changes in these biomarkers suggest decreased exposure to contaminants. Our study reinforces the value of macrophage aggregates and HSI as biomarkers of environmental contamination, and the correlation with remedial action shows their potential utility in documenting improvements in environmental conditions.

AB - The percentage of splenic tissue occupied by macrophage aggregates and hepatosomatic index (HSI) were evaluated in rock bass Ambloplites rupestris from Burlington Harbor, Vermont. In 1992, fish collected from the inner Burlington Harbor area had a significantly greater percentage of splenic tissue occupied by macrophage aggregates and greater HSI than did fish from reference sites. These biomarkers often are correlated with exposure to various contaminants (e.g., polychlorinated biphenyls, polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons, and some heavy metals, which were found in Burlington Harbor sediments during surveys in 1990 and 1991). Contaminants are believed to have entered Burlington Harbor through the city's main sewage treatment plant, which discharged effluent into the harbor for many years. In 1994, the city completed a significant upgrade of this treatment plant, which included an extension of the effluent pipe beyond the inner harbor area. In 1999, rock bass were again collected from Burlington Harbor as an index of whether there was any improvement in environmental quality. Our data showed a significantly lower percentage of splenic tissue occupied by macrophage aggregates and significantly lower HSI among nine age-4 rock bass in 1999 than among six age-4 rock bass in 1992. The significant changes in these biomarkers suggest decreased exposure to contaminants. Our study reinforces the value of macrophage aggregates and HSI as biomarkers of environmental contamination, and the correlation with remedial action shows their potential utility in documenting improvements in environmental conditions.

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=24644480920&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=24644480920&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1577/H04-055.1

DO - 10.1577/H04-055.1

M3 - Article

AN - SCOPUS:24644480920

VL - 17

SP - 263

EP - 266

JO - Journal of Aquatic Animal Health

JF - Journal of Aquatic Animal Health

SN - 0899-7659

IS - 3

ER -