Using Google Blogs and Discussions to Recommend Biomedical Resources: A Case Study

Robyn Reed, Ansuman Chattopadhyay, Carrie L. Iwema

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

2 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

This case study investigated whether data gathered from discussions within the social media provide a reliable basis for a biomedical resources recommendation system. Using a search query to mine text from Google Blogs and Discussions, a ranking of biomedical resources was determined based on those most frequently mentioned. To establish quality, these results were compared with rankings by subject experts. An overall agreement between the frequency of social media discussions and subject expert recommendations was observed when identifying key bioinformatics and consumer health resources. Testing the method in more than one biomedical area implies this procedure could be employed across different subjects.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)396-411
Number of pages16
JournalMedical Reference Services Quarterly
Volume32
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - Oct 1 2013

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Blogging
Social Media
weblog
search engine
social media
ranking
Health Resources
Computational Biology
resources
expert
health

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Health Informatics
  • Library and Information Sciences

Cite this

Reed, Robyn ; Chattopadhyay, Ansuman ; Iwema, Carrie L. / Using Google Blogs and Discussions to Recommend Biomedical Resources : A Case Study. In: Medical Reference Services Quarterly. 2013 ; Vol. 32, No. 4. pp. 396-411.
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Using Google Blogs and Discussions to Recommend Biomedical Resources : A Case Study. / Reed, Robyn; Chattopadhyay, Ansuman; Iwema, Carrie L.

In: Medical Reference Services Quarterly, Vol. 32, No. 4, 01.10.2013, p. 396-411.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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