Using migration degree to distinguish Post-Industrial U.S. cities

Clio Maria Andris, Cindy Cook

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

Abstract

Migration between cities is typically modeled in terms of factors in each city, such as job availability or wages. This framing does not capture the diversity of information flow and social networks within a city. Instead, an "attractive" city (due to wages, etc.) is considered attractive to all potential migrants-regardless personal tacit knowledge and geolocated social capi-tal. One way to capture the diversity of decisions that may be the result of di-verse information flow and values is to measure each city's migration net-work degree. Given this notion, we explore the use of migration network degree to distinguish attractive cities for migrants. We use a network of U.S. CBSA-to-CBSA migration flows for more than 200 million people from 1990-2011. We find that certain derivations of network degree, i.e. variety of flow origins and destinations, can successfully distinguish eco-nomically-declining Post-Industrial region cities from U.S. cities at large.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Title of host publicationCUPUM 2015 - 14th International Conference on Computers in Urban Planning and Urban Management
PublisherCUPUM
ISBN (Electronic)9780692474341
StatePublished - Jan 1 2015
Event14th International Conference on Computers in Urban Planning and Urban Management, CUPUM 2015 - Cambridge, United States
Duration: Jul 7 2015Jul 10 2015

Publication series

NameCUPUM 2015 - 14th International Conference on Computers in Urban Planning and Urban Management

Other

Other14th International Conference on Computers in Urban Planning and Urban Management, CUPUM 2015
CountryUnited States
CityCambridge
Period7/7/157/10/15

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Environmental Engineering
  • Geography, Planning and Development
  • Urban Studies
  • Ecology
  • Civil and Structural Engineering

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  • Cite this

    Andris, C. M., & Cook, C. (2015). Using migration degree to distinguish Post-Industrial U.S. cities. In CUPUM 2015 - 14th International Conference on Computers in Urban Planning and Urban Management (CUPUM 2015 - 14th International Conference on Computers in Urban Planning and Urban Management). CUPUM.