Using Mobile-Technology-Based Ecological Momentary Assessment (EMA) Methods with Youth: A Systematic Review and Recommendations

Kristin E. Heron, Robin S. Everhart, Susan Marie McHale, Joshua Morrison Smyth

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

24 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Ecological momentary assessment (EMA) methods are increasingly used in social and health sciences, but the feasibility and best practices for using EMA with youth are not yet clear. We conducted a systematic review of studies that used self-report EMA methods with youth; the goal was to identify common approaches and challenges to implementation and develop recommendations for future research. We examined 54 peer-reviewed papers that reported on 24 unique studies. Papers were evaluated using a standardized, three-dimensional coding scheme focused on the following: (1) sample characteristics; (2) EMA data collection methods (sampling duration, frequency, hardware/software); (3) study implementation methods (technical/logistical challenges, training participants, compliance). Overall, the research suggests EMA can be successfully implemented with youth (age∼ ≥7) from diverse backgrounds, but protocol adaptations may be necessary for younger children. Study design and implementation challenges and recommendations for research on youth are provided.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1087-1107
Number of pages21
JournalJournal of pediatric psychology
Volume42
Issue number10
DOIs
StatePublished - Nov 1 2017

Fingerprint

Technology
Practice Guidelines
Research
Self Report
Compliance
Software
Ecological Momentary Assessment
Health

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Pediatrics, Perinatology, and Child Health
  • Developmental and Educational Psychology

Cite this

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abstract = "Ecological momentary assessment (EMA) methods are increasingly used in social and health sciences, but the feasibility and best practices for using EMA with youth are not yet clear. We conducted a systematic review of studies that used self-report EMA methods with youth; the goal was to identify common approaches and challenges to implementation and develop recommendations for future research. We examined 54 peer-reviewed papers that reported on 24 unique studies. Papers were evaluated using a standardized, three-dimensional coding scheme focused on the following: (1) sample characteristics; (2) EMA data collection methods (sampling duration, frequency, hardware/software); (3) study implementation methods (technical/logistical challenges, training participants, compliance). Overall, the research suggests EMA can be successfully implemented with youth (age∼ ≥7) from diverse backgrounds, but protocol adaptations may be necessary for younger children. Study design and implementation challenges and recommendations for research on youth are provided.",
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Using Mobile-Technology-Based Ecological Momentary Assessment (EMA) Methods with Youth : A Systematic Review and Recommendations. / Heron, Kristin E.; Everhart, Robin S.; McHale, Susan Marie; Smyth, Joshua Morrison.

In: Journal of pediatric psychology, Vol. 42, No. 10, 01.11.2017, p. 1087-1107.

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

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