Using Young Adult Literature to Develop Content Knowledge of Autism for Preservice Teachers

Elizabeth Murphy Hughes, Sarah Hunt-Barron, Jennifer Young Wagner, Lea Calvert Evering

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

1 Citation (Scopus)

Abstract

This promising practice explores the use of young adult literature as a supplement to texts in an undergraduate introduction to a special education course. Literature portraying adolescent characters with autism spectrum disorder (ASD) were used to build schema of preservice teachers. Participants' knowledge and attitudes about ASD were examined before and after reading a young adult novel of their choice. Results indicated that students in the literature group out-performed peers in the control group on measures of ASD content. Exemplars of students' responses suggested students who read the novel expressed increased knowledge and interest, recognition of commonalities, and complex and nuanced views of ASD. Participant satisfaction with reading the novels outside of class was also high, suggesting students found the authentic literacy experience enjoyable.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)208-224
Number of pages17
JournalTeacher Educator
Volume49
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 2014

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autism
young adult
teacher
student
special education
supplement
Group
literacy
adolescent
literature
experience

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Education

Cite this

Hughes, Elizabeth Murphy ; Hunt-Barron, Sarah ; Wagner, Jennifer Young ; Evering, Lea Calvert. / Using Young Adult Literature to Develop Content Knowledge of Autism for Preservice Teachers. In: Teacher Educator. 2014 ; Vol. 49, No. 3. pp. 208-224.
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Using Young Adult Literature to Develop Content Knowledge of Autism for Preservice Teachers. / Hughes, Elizabeth Murphy; Hunt-Barron, Sarah; Wagner, Jennifer Young; Evering, Lea Calvert.

In: Teacher Educator, Vol. 49, No. 3, 01.01.2014, p. 208-224.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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