Utility of the dexamethasone suppression test in the diagnosis of poststroke depression

S. E. Grober, W. A. Gordon, Martin John Sliwinski, M. R. Hibbard, E. G. Aletta, P. L. Paddison

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

13 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

The utility of the dexamethasone suppression test (DST) in the diagnosis of depression was examined in an outpatient sample of 29 stroke patients. Results indicated that the DST's sensitivity was 15%, its specificity was 67%, and its positive predictive value was 48%. These findings suggest that the DST yields no more information than would be gained from random assignment of the diagnosis of depression. Therefore, it is not a useful measure of mood in these patients.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1076-1079
Number of pages4
JournalArchives of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation
Volume72
Issue number13
StatePublished - 1991

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Dexamethasone
Depression
Outpatients
Stroke

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Rehabilitation

Cite this

Grober, S. E., Gordon, W. A., Sliwinski, M. J., Hibbard, M. R., Aletta, E. G., & Paddison, P. L. (1991). Utility of the dexamethasone suppression test in the diagnosis of poststroke depression. Archives of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation, 72(13), 1076-1079.
Grober, S. E. ; Gordon, W. A. ; Sliwinski, Martin John ; Hibbard, M. R. ; Aletta, E. G. ; Paddison, P. L. / Utility of the dexamethasone suppression test in the diagnosis of poststroke depression. In: Archives of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation. 1991 ; Vol. 72, No. 13. pp. 1076-1079.
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Grober, SE, Gordon, WA, Sliwinski, MJ, Hibbard, MR, Aletta, EG & Paddison, PL 1991, 'Utility of the dexamethasone suppression test in the diagnosis of poststroke depression', Archives of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation, vol. 72, no. 13, pp. 1076-1079.

Utility of the dexamethasone suppression test in the diagnosis of poststroke depression. / Grober, S. E.; Gordon, W. A.; Sliwinski, Martin John; Hibbard, M. R.; Aletta, E. G.; Paddison, P. L.

In: Archives of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation, Vol. 72, No. 13, 1991, p. 1076-1079.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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