Utility-theoretic training for mass casualty incidents

Steven R. Haynes, Mark J. Jermusyk, Frank E. Ritter

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

1 Scopus citations

Abstract

This paper describes an approach to training emergency responders for mass casualty incidents. The approach is derived from a methodology and supporting software system called Summit. The Summit approach uses an integration of scenarios, hierarchical task analysis, interaction modeling, and expected utility theory to represent how actors engage in complex tasks; here we model mass casualty incident (MCI) activities supported by interactive technologies. Our goal is to ground MCI training in realistic scenarios and to demonstrate required response capabilities through associated hierarchical task analyses (HTA). The terminal nodes in an HTA are interactions, that provide a fine-grained model of the actors, technologies, data, and methods involved in realizing the required capability. The components of an interaction may have associated utility factors (benefits, costs, and risks) that provide learners with a rationale-based resource for understanding how different technologies are used to support MCI response efforts. Assessment of the approach is underway within a local EMS organization.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Title of host publicationISCRAM 2014 Conference Proceedings - 11th International Conference on Information Systems for Crisis Response and Management
PublisherThe Pennsylvania State University
Pages473-482
Number of pages10
ISBN (Print)9780692211946
StatePublished - Jan 1 2014
Event11th International Conference on Information Systems for Crisis Response and Management, ISCRAM 2014 - University Park, PA, United States
Duration: May 1 2014May 1 2014

Publication series

NameISCRAM 2014 Conference Proceedings - 11th International Conference on Information Systems for Crisis Response and Management

Other

Other11th International Conference on Information Systems for Crisis Response and Management, ISCRAM 2014
CountryUnited States
CityUniversity Park, PA
Period5/1/145/1/14

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Information Systems

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  • Cite this

    Haynes, S. R., Jermusyk, M. J., & Ritter, F. E. (2014). Utility-theoretic training for mass casualty incidents. In ISCRAM 2014 Conference Proceedings - 11th International Conference on Information Systems for Crisis Response and Management (pp. 473-482). (ISCRAM 2014 Conference Proceedings - 11th International Conference on Information Systems for Crisis Response and Management). The Pennsylvania State University.