Utilizing anthropometric data to improve the usability of desk bikes, and influence of desk bikes on reading and typing performance

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10 Scopus citations

Abstract

This study investigated the feasibility of using a desk bike in an office setting. Workstation measurements were introduced to accommodate 95% of the general U.S. population in using desk bikes. Reading and typing performances were compared at three different cycling conditions (no cycling, 10 and 25 W). Thirty healthy individuals (15 female and 15 male; Age mean: 23.1, σ: 4.19) were recruited based on 5/50/95th percentile stature. Participants were required to select preferred workstation settings and perform reading and typing tasks while pedaling. According to anthropometric measurements and variability from user preference, recommended adjustable ranges of workstation settings for the general U.S. population were derived. Repeated measures ANOVA showed that pedaling had no significant effect on reading comprehension (p > 0.05), but had significant effect on typing performance (p < 0.001). A preferred level of cycling intensity was determined (mean 17.3 W, σ: 3.69).

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)128-135
Number of pages8
JournalApplied Ergonomics
Volume60
DOIs
StatePublished - Apr 1 2017

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Human Factors and Ergonomics
  • Physical Therapy, Sports Therapy and Rehabilitation
  • Safety, Risk, Reliability and Quality
  • Engineering (miscellaneous)

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