Varenicline for tobacco dependence

Panacea or plight?

Jill M. Williams, Michael B. Steinberg, Marc L. Steinberg, Kunal K. Gandhi, Rajiv Ulpe, Jonathan Foulds

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

16 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Introduction: This review examines the postmarketing experience with varenicline, including case reports, newer clinical trials and secondary analyses of large clinical datasets. Areas covered: Varenicline has been shown to be an effective treatment in a broad range of tobacco users with medical, behavioral and diverse demographic characteristics. Recent studies finding excellent safety and efficacy in groups of smokers with diseases including chronic obstructive pulmonary disease are particularly encouraging and call for increased use of this medication for smoking cessation. Despite case reports of serious neuropsychiatric symptoms in patients taking varenicline, including changes in behavior and mood, causality has not been established. Recent analyses of large datasets from clinical trials have not demonstrated that varenicline is associated with more depression or suicidality than other treatments for smoking cessation. Expert opinion: Now that additional clinical trials in specific populations and observational studies on treatment-seeking smokers outside of clinical trials have been published, we can be confident that varenicline remains the most efficacious monotherapy for smoking cessation and that its side-effect profile remains good. The risk-to-benefit ratio of receiving varenicline to quit smoking must include the increased chances of quitting smoking and avoiding the sizeable risks of smoked-caused disease and death that remain if tobacco addiction is not properly treated.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1799-1812
Number of pages14
JournalExpert Opinion on Pharmacotherapy
Volume12
Issue number11
DOIs
StatePublished - Aug 1 2011

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Tobacco Use Disorder
Smoking Cessation
Clinical Trials
Tobacco
Smoking
Expert Testimony
Causality
Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease
Observational Studies
Varenicline
Therapeutics
Demography
Depression
Safety
Population

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Pharmacology
  • Pharmacology (medical)

Cite this

Williams, J. M., Steinberg, M. B., Steinberg, M. L., Gandhi, K. K., Ulpe, R., & Foulds, J. (2011). Varenicline for tobacco dependence: Panacea or plight? Expert Opinion on Pharmacotherapy, 12(11), 1799-1812. https://doi.org/10.1517/14656566.2011.587121
Williams, Jill M. ; Steinberg, Michael B. ; Steinberg, Marc L. ; Gandhi, Kunal K. ; Ulpe, Rajiv ; Foulds, Jonathan. / Varenicline for tobacco dependence : Panacea or plight?. In: Expert Opinion on Pharmacotherapy. 2011 ; Vol. 12, No. 11. pp. 1799-1812.
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Williams, JM, Steinberg, MB, Steinberg, ML, Gandhi, KK, Ulpe, R & Foulds, J 2011, 'Varenicline for tobacco dependence: Panacea or plight?', Expert Opinion on Pharmacotherapy, vol. 12, no. 11, pp. 1799-1812. https://doi.org/10.1517/14656566.2011.587121

Varenicline for tobacco dependence : Panacea or plight? / Williams, Jill M.; Steinberg, Michael B.; Steinberg, Marc L.; Gandhi, Kunal K.; Ulpe, Rajiv; Foulds, Jonathan.

In: Expert Opinion on Pharmacotherapy, Vol. 12, No. 11, 01.08.2011, p. 1799-1812.

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

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