Variations in the global carbon cycle during the Cretaceous related to climate, volcanism, and changes in atmospheric CO2.

Michael Allan Arthur, W. E. Dean, S. O. Schlanger

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

289 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

A marked increase in the rate of CO2 outgassing due to volcanic activity between about 110 and 70Ma may have resulted in a buildup of atmospheric CO2. A significant fraction of this atmospheric CO2 may have been reduced by an increase in the production and burial of terrestrial organic carbon. Some excess CO2 may have been consumed by marine algal photosynthesis, but marine productivity apparently was low during the Aptian-Albian relative to terrestrial productivity. Terrestrial productivity also may have been stimulated by increased rainfall that resulted from a warm global climate and increased marine transgression as well as by the higher CO2. -Authors

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)504-529
Number of pages26
JournalUnknown Journal
StatePublished - Jan 1 1985

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carbon cycle
volcanism
Cretaceous
productivity
climate
Aptian
transgression
global climate
photosynthesis
organic carbon
rainfall

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Environmental Science(all)
  • Earth and Planetary Sciences(all)

Cite this

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Variations in the global carbon cycle during the Cretaceous related to climate, volcanism, and changes in atmospheric CO2. / Arthur, Michael Allan; Dean, W. E.; Schlanger, S. O.

In: Unknown Journal, 01.01.1985, p. 504-529.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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