Vertical similarity in spoken word recognition

Multiple lexical activation, individual differences, and the role of sentence context

Cynthia M. Connine, Dawn Blasko, Jian Wang

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

49 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Four experiments investigated acoustic-phonetic similarity in the mapping process between the speech signal and lexical representations (vertical similarity). Auditory stimuli were used where ambiguous initial phonemes rendered a phoneme sequence lexically ambiguous (perceptual-lexical ambiguities). A cross-modal priming paradigm (Experiments 1, 2, and 3) showed facilitation for targets related to both interpretations of the ambiguities, indicating multiple activation. Experiment 4 investigated individual differences and the role of sentence context in vertical similarity mapping. The results support a model where spoken word recognition proceeds via goodness-of-fit mapping between speech and lexical representations that is not influenced by sentence context.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)624-636
Number of pages13
JournalPerception & Psychophysics
Volume56
Issue number6
DOIs
StatePublished - Nov 1 1994

Fingerprint

Individuality
activation
Cross-Priming
Phonetics
experiment
Acoustics
phonetics
acoustics
stimulus
paradigm
interpretation
Individual Differences
Lexical Activation
Sentence Context
Spoken Word Recognition
Experiment
Phoneme
Lexical Representation
Ambiguous Sequence
Facilitation

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Experimental and Cognitive Psychology
  • Sensory Systems
  • Psychology(all)

Cite this

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abstract = "Four experiments investigated acoustic-phonetic similarity in the mapping process between the speech signal and lexical representations (vertical similarity). Auditory stimuli were used where ambiguous initial phonemes rendered a phoneme sequence lexically ambiguous (perceptual-lexical ambiguities). A cross-modal priming paradigm (Experiments 1, 2, and 3) showed facilitation for targets related to both interpretations of the ambiguities, indicating multiple activation. Experiment 4 investigated individual differences and the role of sentence context in vertical similarity mapping. The results support a model where spoken word recognition proceeds via goodness-of-fit mapping between speech and lexical representations that is not influenced by sentence context.",
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Vertical similarity in spoken word recognition : Multiple lexical activation, individual differences, and the role of sentence context. / Connine, Cynthia M.; Blasko, Dawn; Wang, Jian.

In: Perception & Psychophysics, Vol. 56, No. 6, 01.11.1994, p. 624-636.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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