Vertical similarity in spoken word recognition: Multiple lexical activation, individual differences, and the role of sentence context

Cynthia M. Connine, Dawn G. Blasko, Jian Wang

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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Abstract

Four experiments investigated acoustic-phonetic similarity in the mapping process between the speech signal and lexical representations (vertical similarity). Auditory stimuli were used where ambiguous initial phonemes rendered a phoneme sequence lexically ambiguous (perceptual-lexical ambiguities). A cross-modal priming paradigm (Experiments 1, 2, and 3) showed facilitation for targets related to both interpretations of the ambiguities, indicating multiple activation. Experiment 4 investigated individual differences and the role of sentence context in vertical similarity mapping. The results support a model where spoken word recognition proceeds via goodness-of-fit mapping between speech and lexical representations that is not influenced by sentence context.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)624-636
Number of pages13
JournalPerception & Psychophysics
Volume56
Issue number6
DOIs
StatePublished - Nov 1 1994

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Experimental and Cognitive Psychology
  • Sensory Systems
  • Psychology(all)

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