Very-high-energy gamma-ray signal from nuclear photodisintegration as a probe of extragalactic sources of ultrahigh-energy nuclei

Kohta Murase, John F. Beacom

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

21 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

It is crucial to identify the ultrahigh-energy cosmic-ray sources and probe their unknown properties. Recent results from the Pierre Auger Observatory favor a heavy nuclear composition for the ultrahigh-energy cosmic rays. Under the requirement that heavy nuclei survive in these sources, using gamma-ray bursts as an example, we predict a diagnostic gamma-ray signal, unique to nuclei-the emission of deexcitation gamma rays following photodisintegration. These gamma rays, boosted from MeV to TeV-PeV energies, may be detectable by gamma-ray telescopes such as VERITAS, HESS, and MAGIC, and especially the next-generation CTA and AGIS. They are a promising messenger to identify and study individual ultrahigh-energy nuclei accelerators.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Article number043008
JournalPhysical Review D - Particles, Fields, Gravitation and Cosmology
Volume82
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - Aug 19 2010

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gamma rays
nuclei
probes
cosmic rays
gamma ray telescopes
energy
heavy nuclei
gamma ray bursts
observatories
accelerators
requirements

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Nuclear and High Energy Physics
  • Physics and Astronomy (miscellaneous)

Cite this

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