Vibrating needle cutting force

Andrew C. Barnett, Kelilah Wolkowicz, Jason Zachary Moore

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

6 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Needles are one of most commonly used medical devices, used to deliver drugs, biopsy tissue, draw blood, conduct brachytherapy cancer treatment and many other procedures. Maintaining a low insertion force of the needle is important to the success of these procedures. Utilizing vibratory cutting reduces the insertion force, thus improving the outcome of the procedure. This paper describes the experimental setup utilized to test the effectiveness of axial vibration in reducing the insertion force into porcine skin across a range of frequencies, amplitudes and needle sizes. Experiments showed the addition of the vibration was able to reduce the insertion force by up to 35%. The minimum insertion force occurred at lower maximum vibratory insertion speeds for larger diameter needles.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Title of host publicationASME 2014 International Manufacturing Science and Engineering Conference, MSEC 2014 Collocated with the JSME 2014 International Conference on Materials and Processing and the 42nd North American Manufacturing Research Conference
PublisherWeb Portal ASME (American Society of Mechanical Engineers)
Volume2
ISBN (Electronic)9780791845813
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 2014
EventASME 2014 International Manufacturing Science and Engineering Conference, MSEC 2014 Collocated with the JSME 2014 International Conference on Materials and Processing and the 42nd North American Manufacturing Research Conference - Detroit, United States
Duration: Jun 9 2014Jun 13 2014

Other

OtherASME 2014 International Manufacturing Science and Engineering Conference, MSEC 2014 Collocated with the JSME 2014 International Conference on Materials and Processing and the 42nd North American Manufacturing Research Conference
CountryUnited States
CityDetroit
Period6/9/146/13/14

Fingerprint

Needles
Oncology
Biopsy
Skin
Blood
Tissue
Experiments

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Industrial and Manufacturing Engineering

Cite this

Barnett, A. C., Wolkowicz, K., & Moore, J. Z. (2014). Vibrating needle cutting force. In ASME 2014 International Manufacturing Science and Engineering Conference, MSEC 2014 Collocated with the JSME 2014 International Conference on Materials and Processing and the 42nd North American Manufacturing Research Conference (Vol. 2). [V002T02A025] Web Portal ASME (American Society of Mechanical Engineers). https://doi.org/10.1115/MSEC2014-4049
Barnett, Andrew C. ; Wolkowicz, Kelilah ; Moore, Jason Zachary. / Vibrating needle cutting force. ASME 2014 International Manufacturing Science and Engineering Conference, MSEC 2014 Collocated with the JSME 2014 International Conference on Materials and Processing and the 42nd North American Manufacturing Research Conference. Vol. 2 Web Portal ASME (American Society of Mechanical Engineers), 2014.
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abstract = "Needles are one of most commonly used medical devices, used to deliver drugs, biopsy tissue, draw blood, conduct brachytherapy cancer treatment and many other procedures. Maintaining a low insertion force of the needle is important to the success of these procedures. Utilizing vibratory cutting reduces the insertion force, thus improving the outcome of the procedure. This paper describes the experimental setup utilized to test the effectiveness of axial vibration in reducing the insertion force into porcine skin across a range of frequencies, amplitudes and needle sizes. Experiments showed the addition of the vibration was able to reduce the insertion force by up to 35{\%}. The minimum insertion force occurred at lower maximum vibratory insertion speeds for larger diameter needles.",
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Barnett, AC, Wolkowicz, K & Moore, JZ 2014, Vibrating needle cutting force. in ASME 2014 International Manufacturing Science and Engineering Conference, MSEC 2014 Collocated with the JSME 2014 International Conference on Materials and Processing and the 42nd North American Manufacturing Research Conference. vol. 2, V002T02A025, Web Portal ASME (American Society of Mechanical Engineers), ASME 2014 International Manufacturing Science and Engineering Conference, MSEC 2014 Collocated with the JSME 2014 International Conference on Materials and Processing and the 42nd North American Manufacturing Research Conference, Detroit, United States, 6/9/14. https://doi.org/10.1115/MSEC2014-4049

Vibrating needle cutting force. / Barnett, Andrew C.; Wolkowicz, Kelilah; Moore, Jason Zachary.

ASME 2014 International Manufacturing Science and Engineering Conference, MSEC 2014 Collocated with the JSME 2014 International Conference on Materials and Processing and the 42nd North American Manufacturing Research Conference. Vol. 2 Web Portal ASME (American Society of Mechanical Engineers), 2014. V002T02A025.

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

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AB - Needles are one of most commonly used medical devices, used to deliver drugs, biopsy tissue, draw blood, conduct brachytherapy cancer treatment and many other procedures. Maintaining a low insertion force of the needle is important to the success of these procedures. Utilizing vibratory cutting reduces the insertion force, thus improving the outcome of the procedure. This paper describes the experimental setup utilized to test the effectiveness of axial vibration in reducing the insertion force into porcine skin across a range of frequencies, amplitudes and needle sizes. Experiments showed the addition of the vibration was able to reduce the insertion force by up to 35%. The minimum insertion force occurred at lower maximum vibratory insertion speeds for larger diameter needles.

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Barnett AC, Wolkowicz K, Moore JZ. Vibrating needle cutting force. In ASME 2014 International Manufacturing Science and Engineering Conference, MSEC 2014 Collocated with the JSME 2014 International Conference on Materials and Processing and the 42nd North American Manufacturing Research Conference. Vol. 2. Web Portal ASME (American Society of Mechanical Engineers). 2014. V002T02A025 https://doi.org/10.1115/MSEC2014-4049