Vibration data acquisition and analysis for a small residential wind turbine

Shannon Sweeney, Robert Michael

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

Abstract

This paper describes an undergraduate student project where the vibration of a small residential wind turbine was investigated. The project was initiated due to the perception that, in cases, vibration from the turbine is excessive, transmitting structure-borne noise and vibration to the residence and adversely affecting marketability of the turbines. In the project, the wind turbine was driven by the output of a wind tunnel for a range of typical operating wind speeds. A three channel analyzer was used to acquire vibration data at various points and in various directions. Vibration data was acquired from the housing of the turbine and generator along with the supporting structure. From the vibration data, waterfall plots were created, revealing natural frequencies and forced frequency responses that are a function of turbine speed. The project answered some questions but left others unanswered. This paper describes the student work to acquire vibration data and the work to verify the results through hand calculations. This paper also outlines future work necessary to understand vibration associated with small residential wind turbines.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Title of host publicationVibration Institute Annual Training Conference 2012
PublisherVibration Institute
Pages145-154
Number of pages10
ISBN (Electronic)9781627480284
StatePublished - Jan 1 2012
EventVibration Institute Annual Training Conference 2012 - Williamsburg, United States
Duration: Jun 19 2012Jun 22 2012

Other

OtherVibration Institute Annual Training Conference 2012
CountryUnited States
CityWilliamsburg
Period6/19/126/22/12

Fingerprint

wind turbines
data acquisition
vibration
turbines
students
wind tunnels
frequency response
resonant frequencies
analyzers
generators
plots
output

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Acoustics and Ultrasonics

Cite this

Sweeney, S., & Michael, R. (2012). Vibration data acquisition and analysis for a small residential wind turbine. In Vibration Institute Annual Training Conference 2012 (pp. 145-154). Vibration Institute.
Sweeney, Shannon ; Michael, Robert. / Vibration data acquisition and analysis for a small residential wind turbine. Vibration Institute Annual Training Conference 2012. Vibration Institute, 2012. pp. 145-154
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Sweeney, S & Michael, R 2012, Vibration data acquisition and analysis for a small residential wind turbine. in Vibration Institute Annual Training Conference 2012. Vibration Institute, pp. 145-154, Vibration Institute Annual Training Conference 2012, Williamsburg, United States, 6/19/12.

Vibration data acquisition and analysis for a small residential wind turbine. / Sweeney, Shannon; Michael, Robert.

Vibration Institute Annual Training Conference 2012. Vibration Institute, 2012. p. 145-154.

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

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Sweeney S, Michael R. Vibration data acquisition and analysis for a small residential wind turbine. In Vibration Institute Annual Training Conference 2012. Vibration Institute. 2012. p. 145-154