Victim help seeking: Differences between intimate terrorism and situational couple violence

Janel M. Leone, Michael P. Johnson, Catherine L. Cohan

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

98 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Research indicates that two major forms of partner violence exist, intimate terrorism (IT) and situational couple violence (SCV). The current study (N = 389) used a subgroup of women who responded to the Chicago Women's Health Risk Study to examine whether type of violence experienced is differentially related to formal (e.g., police, medical agencies, counseling) and informal (e.g., family, friends/neighbors) help seeking. IT victims were more likely to seek each type of formal help but were equally or less likely to seek informal help. Findings can inform both family violence research and the development and implementation of social service programs.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)427-439
Number of pages13
JournalFamily Relations
Volume56
Issue number5
DOIs
StatePublished - Dec 1 2007

Fingerprint

Terrorism
Violence
terrorism
violence
Domestic Violence
Police
Women's Health
Social Work
Research
Counseling
health risk
mobile social services
counseling
police
Intimate Partner Violence

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Education
  • Developmental and Educational Psychology
  • Social Sciences (miscellaneous)

Cite this

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Victim help seeking : Differences between intimate terrorism and situational couple violence. / Leone, Janel M.; Johnson, Michael P.; Cohan, Catherine L.

In: Family Relations, Vol. 56, No. 5, 01.12.2007, p. 427-439.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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