Violence Against Latinas: The Effects of Undocumented Status on Rates of Victimization and Help-Seeking

Elizabeth Zadnik, Chiara Sabina, Carlos A. Cuevas

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

16 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

This study investigated whether legal status was related to interpersonal victimization and help-seeking by comparing Latina immigrants with permanent legal status with Latina immigrants who are undocumented on rates of reported interpersonal victimization, types of perpetrators, and rates of help-seeking. Data come from the Sexual Assault Among Latinas (SALAS) study, which interviewed 1,377 immigrant Latinas about their lifetime histories of sexual assault, physical assault, stalking, and threats along with help-seeking efforts. Results did not reveal significant differences between legal status and reported victimization rates or types of perpetrators. However, undocumented Latinas (n = 91) were less likely to seek formal help than those with permanent status. Results of this study indicate that undocumented status does not independently put women at risk of victimization, but that responses to violence are related to legal status.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1141-1153
Number of pages13
JournalJournal of Interpersonal Violence
Volume31
Issue number6
DOIs
StatePublished - Mar 1 2016

Fingerprint

Crime Victims
Hispanic Americans
Violence
Jurisprudence
Stalking

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Clinical Psychology
  • Applied Psychology

Cite this

Zadnik, Elizabeth ; Sabina, Chiara ; Cuevas, Carlos A. / Violence Against Latinas : The Effects of Undocumented Status on Rates of Victimization and Help-Seeking. In: Journal of Interpersonal Violence. 2016 ; Vol. 31, No. 6. pp. 1141-1153.
@article{5ce441a5c7b44a84abc311a5fa3d30a5,
title = "Violence Against Latinas: The Effects of Undocumented Status on Rates of Victimization and Help-Seeking",
abstract = "This study investigated whether legal status was related to interpersonal victimization and help-seeking by comparing Latina immigrants with permanent legal status with Latina immigrants who are undocumented on rates of reported interpersonal victimization, types of perpetrators, and rates of help-seeking. Data come from the Sexual Assault Among Latinas (SALAS) study, which interviewed 1,377 immigrant Latinas about their lifetime histories of sexual assault, physical assault, stalking, and threats along with help-seeking efforts. Results did not reveal significant differences between legal status and reported victimization rates or types of perpetrators. However, undocumented Latinas (n = 91) were less likely to seek formal help than those with permanent status. Results of this study indicate that undocumented status does not independently put women at risk of victimization, but that responses to violence are related to legal status.",
author = "Elizabeth Zadnik and Chiara Sabina and Cuevas, {Carlos A.}",
year = "2016",
month = "3",
day = "1",
doi = "10.1177/0886260514564062",
language = "English (US)",
volume = "31",
pages = "1141--1153",
journal = "Journal of Interpersonal Violence",
issn = "0886-2605",
publisher = "SAGE Publications Inc.",
number = "6",

}

Violence Against Latinas : The Effects of Undocumented Status on Rates of Victimization and Help-Seeking. / Zadnik, Elizabeth; Sabina, Chiara; Cuevas, Carlos A.

In: Journal of Interpersonal Violence, Vol. 31, No. 6, 01.03.2016, p. 1141-1153.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

TY - JOUR

T1 - Violence Against Latinas

T2 - The Effects of Undocumented Status on Rates of Victimization and Help-Seeking

AU - Zadnik, Elizabeth

AU - Sabina, Chiara

AU - Cuevas, Carlos A.

PY - 2016/3/1

Y1 - 2016/3/1

N2 - This study investigated whether legal status was related to interpersonal victimization and help-seeking by comparing Latina immigrants with permanent legal status with Latina immigrants who are undocumented on rates of reported interpersonal victimization, types of perpetrators, and rates of help-seeking. Data come from the Sexual Assault Among Latinas (SALAS) study, which interviewed 1,377 immigrant Latinas about their lifetime histories of sexual assault, physical assault, stalking, and threats along with help-seeking efforts. Results did not reveal significant differences between legal status and reported victimization rates or types of perpetrators. However, undocumented Latinas (n = 91) were less likely to seek formal help than those with permanent status. Results of this study indicate that undocumented status does not independently put women at risk of victimization, but that responses to violence are related to legal status.

AB - This study investigated whether legal status was related to interpersonal victimization and help-seeking by comparing Latina immigrants with permanent legal status with Latina immigrants who are undocumented on rates of reported interpersonal victimization, types of perpetrators, and rates of help-seeking. Data come from the Sexual Assault Among Latinas (SALAS) study, which interviewed 1,377 immigrant Latinas about their lifetime histories of sexual assault, physical assault, stalking, and threats along with help-seeking efforts. Results did not reveal significant differences between legal status and reported victimization rates or types of perpetrators. However, undocumented Latinas (n = 91) were less likely to seek formal help than those with permanent status. Results of this study indicate that undocumented status does not independently put women at risk of victimization, but that responses to violence are related to legal status.

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=84956883902&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=84956883902&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1177/0886260514564062

DO - 10.1177/0886260514564062

M3 - Article

C2 - 25540190

AN - SCOPUS:84956883902

VL - 31

SP - 1141

EP - 1153

JO - Journal of Interpersonal Violence

JF - Journal of Interpersonal Violence

SN - 0886-2605

IS - 6

ER -