Violence in Roman Social Relations

Garrett G. Fagan

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingChapter

Abstract

This article studies the violence that occurred in some Roman social relations. It shows that violence ruined some social relations among the Romans more than it did others. The Roman elite did not condone violence as a mode of interaction among peers. However, the elite felt that it was completely normal to treat their slaves violently, in order to emphasize their status and authority. The article concludes that Roman social relations were not governed by brutality and violence, and that it was hardly used to resolve interpersonal conflicts.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Title of host publicationThe Oxford Handbook of Social Relations in the Roman World
PublisherOxford University Press
ISBN (Electronic)9780199940677
ISBN (Print)9780195188004
DOIs
StatePublished - Sep 18 2012

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Arts and Humanities(all)

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  • Cite this

    Fagan, G. G. (2012). Violence in Roman Social Relations. In The Oxford Handbook of Social Relations in the Roman World Oxford University Press. https://doi.org/10.1093/oxfordhb/9780195188004.013.0022