Virtual Justice: Testing Disposition Theory in the Context of a Story-Driven Video Game

Mike Schmierbach, Anthony M. Limperos

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

4 Scopus citations

Abstract

Using a 2 × 2 experiment, this study tests whether disposition theory can be applied to the processing and enjoyment of video games. Specifically, we test how the interaction of the severity of a crime and the punishment administered to a criminal by the player character affect satisfaction, guilt, and enjoyment. Results show effects on satisfaction and guilt consistent with prior research, but no overall effect on enjoyment. Empathetic individuals enjoyed the more moral outcomes, whereas non-empathetic individuals did not. Broader implications for research on narrative in games are discussed.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)526-542
Number of pages17
JournalJournal of Broadcasting and Electronic Media
Volume57
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 2013

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Communication

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