Virus load and risk of heterosexual transmission of human immunodeficiency virus and hepatitis C virus by men with hemophilia

Michie Hisada, Thomas R. O'Brien, Philip S. Rosenberg, James J. Goedert, Mitchell Gail, Charles Rabkin, Barbara Kroner, Susan Wilson, Louis Aledort, Stephanie Seremetes, Elaine Eyster, Donna Di Michele, Margaret Hilgartner, Barbara Konkle, Philip Blatt, Gilbert White, Alan Cohen, Craig Kessler, Michael Lederman, Cindy LeissingerMarilyn Manco-Johnson, W. Keith Hoots, Philippe De Moerloose, Angelos Hatzakis, Anastasia Karfoulidou, Titika Mandalaki, Wolfgang Schramm, Sabine Eichinger

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

    60 Scopus citations

    Abstract

    A high human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) load may increase the probability of HIV transmission by sexual contact, but the association of virus load of hepatitis C virus (HCV) with risk of HCV transmission is uncertain. HIV and HCV virus loads were examined in hemophilic men, as were risks of HIV and HCV transmission to their female partners in a hemophilia cohort in which most subjects are dually infected. A higher HIV load was associated with an increased risk of HIV transmission (odds ratio [OR], 1.31 per log10 increase in virus load). A higher HCV load was associated, although not significantly, with an increased risk of HCV transmission (OR, 1.42 per log10). HCV load was higher among dually infected men than in those infected with HCV alone (P = .001). However, much larger studies are needed to clearly show whether HIV/HCV coinfection significantly increases the risk of HCV transmission to female partners.

    Original languageEnglish (US)
    Pages (from-to)1475-1478
    Number of pages4
    JournalJournal of Infectious Diseases
    Volume181
    Issue number4
    DOIs
    StatePublished - 2000

    All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

    • Immunology and Allergy
    • Infectious Diseases

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