Visual hallucinations in patients with retinal disease

Ingrid Scott, Oliver D. Schein, William J. Feuer, Marshal F. Folstein

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

42 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

PURPOSE: To investigate the prevalence and phenomenologic nature of visual hallucinations among patients with retinal disease and to investigate whether presence of hallucinations is a significant predictor of functional status, quality of life, and/or emotional distress after adjusting for visual acuity. DESIGN: Cross-sectional study. METHODS: Eighty-six consecutive patients at the Wilmer Ophthalmologic Institute Retinal Vascular Center were interviewed using the Sickness Impact Profile, Community Disability Scale, General Health Questionnaire, Visual Phenomena Interview, Eysenck Personality Questionnaire, and Telephone Interview for Cognitive Status. RESULTS: The prevalence of visual hallucinations was 15.1%. Most were formed hallucinations in clear consciousness that lasted for seconds to minutes. The majority of patients had been experiencing visual hallucinations for less than 1 year (61.5%) or for 1 to 2 years (23.1%). Only two of the 13 patients with hallucinations had informed a physician of their hallucinations. Univariate analyses revealed that variables significantly associated with experiencing hallucinations were female sex, worse visual acuity, bilateral visual impairment, emotional distress, decreased functional status, and decreased quality of life. Regression analysis demonstrated that among patients with relatively good vision, those who experienced hallucinations were more emotionally distressed and had a lower quality of life than patients without hallucinations. CONCLUSIONS: Visual hallucinations among patients with retinal disease are common, underdiagnosed, and not associated with cognitive deficits, abnormal personality traits, or a family or personal history of psychiatric morbidity. Among patients with relatively good vision, hallucinations are associated with increased emotional distress and decreased quality of life.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)590-598
Number of pages9
JournalAmerican Journal of Ophthalmology
Volume131
Issue number5
DOIs
StatePublished - May 21 2001

Fingerprint

Retinal Diseases
Hallucinations
Quality of Life
Visual Acuity
Personality
Sickness Impact Profile
Interviews
Retinal Vessels
Vision Disorders
Consciousness
Psychiatry
Cross-Sectional Studies

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Ophthalmology

Cite this

Scott, Ingrid ; Schein, Oliver D. ; Feuer, William J. ; Folstein, Marshal F. / Visual hallucinations in patients with retinal disease. In: American Journal of Ophthalmology. 2001 ; Vol. 131, No. 5. pp. 590-598.
@article{4cb653cf55db486db0e8b515dbf5282f,
title = "Visual hallucinations in patients with retinal disease",
abstract = "PURPOSE: To investigate the prevalence and phenomenologic nature of visual hallucinations among patients with retinal disease and to investigate whether presence of hallucinations is a significant predictor of functional status, quality of life, and/or emotional distress after adjusting for visual acuity. DESIGN: Cross-sectional study. METHODS: Eighty-six consecutive patients at the Wilmer Ophthalmologic Institute Retinal Vascular Center were interviewed using the Sickness Impact Profile, Community Disability Scale, General Health Questionnaire, Visual Phenomena Interview, Eysenck Personality Questionnaire, and Telephone Interview for Cognitive Status. RESULTS: The prevalence of visual hallucinations was 15.1{\%}. Most were formed hallucinations in clear consciousness that lasted for seconds to minutes. The majority of patients had been experiencing visual hallucinations for less than 1 year (61.5{\%}) or for 1 to 2 years (23.1{\%}). Only two of the 13 patients with hallucinations had informed a physician of their hallucinations. Univariate analyses revealed that variables significantly associated with experiencing hallucinations were female sex, worse visual acuity, bilateral visual impairment, emotional distress, decreased functional status, and decreased quality of life. Regression analysis demonstrated that among patients with relatively good vision, those who experienced hallucinations were more emotionally distressed and had a lower quality of life than patients without hallucinations. CONCLUSIONS: Visual hallucinations among patients with retinal disease are common, underdiagnosed, and not associated with cognitive deficits, abnormal personality traits, or a family or personal history of psychiatric morbidity. Among patients with relatively good vision, hallucinations are associated with increased emotional distress and decreased quality of life.",
author = "Ingrid Scott and Schein, {Oliver D.} and Feuer, {William J.} and Folstein, {Marshal F.}",
year = "2001",
month = "5",
day = "21",
doi = "10.1016/S0002-9394(01)00833-9",
language = "English (US)",
volume = "131",
pages = "590--598",
journal = "American Journal of Ophthalmology",
issn = "0002-9394",
publisher = "Elsevier USA",
number = "5",

}

Visual hallucinations in patients with retinal disease. / Scott, Ingrid; Schein, Oliver D.; Feuer, William J.; Folstein, Marshal F.

In: American Journal of Ophthalmology, Vol. 131, No. 5, 21.05.2001, p. 590-598.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

TY - JOUR

T1 - Visual hallucinations in patients with retinal disease

AU - Scott, Ingrid

AU - Schein, Oliver D.

AU - Feuer, William J.

AU - Folstein, Marshal F.

PY - 2001/5/21

Y1 - 2001/5/21

N2 - PURPOSE: To investigate the prevalence and phenomenologic nature of visual hallucinations among patients with retinal disease and to investigate whether presence of hallucinations is a significant predictor of functional status, quality of life, and/or emotional distress after adjusting for visual acuity. DESIGN: Cross-sectional study. METHODS: Eighty-six consecutive patients at the Wilmer Ophthalmologic Institute Retinal Vascular Center were interviewed using the Sickness Impact Profile, Community Disability Scale, General Health Questionnaire, Visual Phenomena Interview, Eysenck Personality Questionnaire, and Telephone Interview for Cognitive Status. RESULTS: The prevalence of visual hallucinations was 15.1%. Most were formed hallucinations in clear consciousness that lasted for seconds to minutes. The majority of patients had been experiencing visual hallucinations for less than 1 year (61.5%) or for 1 to 2 years (23.1%). Only two of the 13 patients with hallucinations had informed a physician of their hallucinations. Univariate analyses revealed that variables significantly associated with experiencing hallucinations were female sex, worse visual acuity, bilateral visual impairment, emotional distress, decreased functional status, and decreased quality of life. Regression analysis demonstrated that among patients with relatively good vision, those who experienced hallucinations were more emotionally distressed and had a lower quality of life than patients without hallucinations. CONCLUSIONS: Visual hallucinations among patients with retinal disease are common, underdiagnosed, and not associated with cognitive deficits, abnormal personality traits, or a family or personal history of psychiatric morbidity. Among patients with relatively good vision, hallucinations are associated with increased emotional distress and decreased quality of life.

AB - PURPOSE: To investigate the prevalence and phenomenologic nature of visual hallucinations among patients with retinal disease and to investigate whether presence of hallucinations is a significant predictor of functional status, quality of life, and/or emotional distress after adjusting for visual acuity. DESIGN: Cross-sectional study. METHODS: Eighty-six consecutive patients at the Wilmer Ophthalmologic Institute Retinal Vascular Center were interviewed using the Sickness Impact Profile, Community Disability Scale, General Health Questionnaire, Visual Phenomena Interview, Eysenck Personality Questionnaire, and Telephone Interview for Cognitive Status. RESULTS: The prevalence of visual hallucinations was 15.1%. Most were formed hallucinations in clear consciousness that lasted for seconds to minutes. The majority of patients had been experiencing visual hallucinations for less than 1 year (61.5%) or for 1 to 2 years (23.1%). Only two of the 13 patients with hallucinations had informed a physician of their hallucinations. Univariate analyses revealed that variables significantly associated with experiencing hallucinations were female sex, worse visual acuity, bilateral visual impairment, emotional distress, decreased functional status, and decreased quality of life. Regression analysis demonstrated that among patients with relatively good vision, those who experienced hallucinations were more emotionally distressed and had a lower quality of life than patients without hallucinations. CONCLUSIONS: Visual hallucinations among patients with retinal disease are common, underdiagnosed, and not associated with cognitive deficits, abnormal personality traits, or a family or personal history of psychiatric morbidity. Among patients with relatively good vision, hallucinations are associated with increased emotional distress and decreased quality of life.

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=0035002075&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=0035002075&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1016/S0002-9394(01)00833-9

DO - 10.1016/S0002-9394(01)00833-9

M3 - Article

C2 - 11336933

AN - SCOPUS:0035002075

VL - 131

SP - 590

EP - 598

JO - American Journal of Ophthalmology

JF - American Journal of Ophthalmology

SN - 0002-9394

IS - 5

ER -