Vitamin A and retinoids in antiviral responses

A. Catharine Ross, Charles B. Stephensen

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

84 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Vitamin A deficiency results in multiple derangements that impair the response to infection. This review focuses on experimental models of specific virus infections and oil cytokines and cells with cytolytic activity important to antiviral defenses. Altered specific antibody responses and greater epithelial damage in vitamin A-deficient hosts are consistent findings. The cytolytic activity of natural killer cells and various cytokine responses are altered. The inflammatory response to infection may also result in derangements in the transport and metabolism of retinol. We speculate that interaction of several factors may combine to explain the greater severity of infection seen in vitamin A-deficient animals and children. In addition to a preexisting lack of tissue vitamin A, these factors may include reduced mobilization and increased excretion of retinol during the acute phase response to infection, poor innate and specific immune response to virus, and delayed repair of damaged epithelia. Foci of vitamin A-deficient epithelia may be sites of penetration of bacteria and other agents, leading to secondary infections and contributing to an increased severity of infections and poor outcome in vitamin A-deficient animals and humans.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)979-985
Number of pages7
JournalFASEB Journal
Volume10
Issue number9
StatePublished - Sep 11 1996

Fingerprint

retinoids
Retinoids
Vitamin A
vitamin A
Antiviral Agents
infection
Infection
Viruses
cytokines
epithelium
Epithelium
Animals
Cytokines
Vitamin A Deficiency
viruses
Acute-Phase Reaction
vitamin A deficiency
natural killer cells
Virus Diseases
Coinfection

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Biotechnology
  • Biochemistry
  • Molecular Biology
  • Genetics

Cite this

Ross, A. C., & Stephensen, C. B. (1996). Vitamin A and retinoids in antiviral responses. FASEB Journal, 10(9), 979-985.
Ross, A. Catharine ; Stephensen, Charles B. / Vitamin A and retinoids in antiviral responses. In: FASEB Journal. 1996 ; Vol. 10, No. 9. pp. 979-985.
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Ross, AC & Stephensen, CB 1996, 'Vitamin A and retinoids in antiviral responses', FASEB Journal, vol. 10, no. 9, pp. 979-985.

Vitamin A and retinoids in antiviral responses. / Ross, A. Catharine; Stephensen, Charles B.

In: FASEB Journal, Vol. 10, No. 9, 11.09.1996, p. 979-985.

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

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AU - Ross, A. Catharine

AU - Stephensen, Charles B.

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AB - Vitamin A deficiency results in multiple derangements that impair the response to infection. This review focuses on experimental models of specific virus infections and oil cytokines and cells with cytolytic activity important to antiviral defenses. Altered specific antibody responses and greater epithelial damage in vitamin A-deficient hosts are consistent findings. The cytolytic activity of natural killer cells and various cytokine responses are altered. The inflammatory response to infection may also result in derangements in the transport and metabolism of retinol. We speculate that interaction of several factors may combine to explain the greater severity of infection seen in vitamin A-deficient animals and children. In addition to a preexisting lack of tissue vitamin A, these factors may include reduced mobilization and increased excretion of retinol during the acute phase response to infection, poor innate and specific immune response to virus, and delayed repair of damaged epithelia. Foci of vitamin A-deficient epithelia may be sites of penetration of bacteria and other agents, leading to secondary infections and contributing to an increased severity of infections and poor outcome in vitamin A-deficient animals and humans.

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Ross AC, Stephensen CB. Vitamin A and retinoids in antiviral responses. FASEB Journal. 1996 Sep 11;10(9):979-985.