Vitamin A and vitamin D regulate the microbial complexity, barrier function, and the mucosal immune responses to ensure intestinal homeostasis

Margherita T. Cantorna, Lindsay Snyder, Juhi Arora

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

9 Scopus citations

Abstract

Diet is an important regulator of the gastrointestinal microbiota. Vitamin A and vitamin D deficiencies result in less diverse, dysbiotic microbial communities and increased susceptibility to infection or injury of the gastrointestinal tract. The vitamin A and vitamin D receptors are nuclear receptors expressed by the host, but not the microbiota. Vitamin A- and vitamin D-mediated regulation of the intestinal epithelium and mucosal immune cells underlies the effects of these nutrients on the microbiota. Vitamin A and vitamin D regulate the expression of tight junction proteins on intestinal epithelial cells that are critical for barrier function in the gut. Other shared functions of vitamin A and vitamin D include the support of innate lymphoid cells that produce IL-22, suppression of IFN-γ and IL-17 by T cells, and induction of regulatory T cells in the mucosal tissues. There are some unique functions of vitamin A and D; for example, vitamin A induces gut homing receptors on T cells, while vitamin D suppresses gut homing receptors on T cells. Together, vitamin A- and vitamin D-mediated regulation of the intestinal epithelium and mucosal immune system shape the microbial communities in the gut to maintain homeostasis.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)184-192
Number of pages9
JournalCritical Reviews in Biochemistry and Molecular Biology
Volume54
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - Mar 4 2019

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Biochemistry
  • Molecular Biology

Fingerprint Dive into the research topics of 'Vitamin A and vitamin D regulate the microbial complexity, barrier function, and the mucosal immune responses to ensure intestinal homeostasis'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

  • Cite this