Vitamin B12 supplementation in treating major depressive disorder: A randomized controlled trial

Ehsan Syed, Mohammad Wasay, Safia Awan

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

19 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Background/Objective: Recent literature has identified links between vitamin B12 deficiency and depression. We compared the clinical response of SSRI-monotherapy with that of B12-augmentation in a sample of depressed patients with low normal B12 levels who responded inadequately to the first trial with the SSRIs. Methods: Patients with depression and low normal B12 levels were randomized to a control arm (antidepressant only) or treatment arm (antidepressants and injectable vitamin B12 supplementation). Results: A total of 199 depressed patients were screened. Out of 73 patients with low normal B12 levels 34 (47%) were randomized to the treatment group while 39 (53%) were randomized to the control arm. At three months follow up 100% of the treatment group showed at least a 20% reduction in HAM-D score, while only 69% in the control arm showed at least a 20% reduction in HAM-D score (p<0.001). The findings remained significant after adjusting for baseline HAM-D score (p=0.001). Conclusion: Vitamin B12 supplementation with antidepressants significantly improved depressive symptoms in our cohort.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)44-48
Number of pages5
JournalOpen Neurology Journal
Volume7
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 2013

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Major Depressive Disorder
Vitamin B 12
Randomized Controlled Trials
Antidepressive Agents
Depression
Vitamin B 12 Deficiency
Therapeutics
Injections

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Neurology
  • Clinical Neurology
  • Psychiatry and Mental health

Cite this

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abstract = "Background/Objective: Recent literature has identified links between vitamin B12 deficiency and depression. We compared the clinical response of SSRI-monotherapy with that of B12-augmentation in a sample of depressed patients with low normal B12 levels who responded inadequately to the first trial with the SSRIs. Methods: Patients with depression and low normal B12 levels were randomized to a control arm (antidepressant only) or treatment arm (antidepressants and injectable vitamin B12 supplementation). Results: A total of 199 depressed patients were screened. Out of 73 patients with low normal B12 levels 34 (47{\%}) were randomized to the treatment group while 39 (53{\%}) were randomized to the control arm. At three months follow up 100{\%} of the treatment group showed at least a 20{\%} reduction in HAM-D score, while only 69{\%} in the control arm showed at least a 20{\%} reduction in HAM-D score (p<0.001). The findings remained significant after adjusting for baseline HAM-D score (p=0.001). Conclusion: Vitamin B12 supplementation with antidepressants significantly improved depressive symptoms in our cohort.",
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Vitamin B12 supplementation in treating major depressive disorder : A randomized controlled trial. / Syed, Ehsan; Wasay, Mohammad; Awan, Safia.

In: Open Neurology Journal, Vol. 7, No. 1, 01.01.2013, p. 44-48.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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