Vitamin D Regulates the Microbiota to Control the Numbers of RORγt/FoxP3+ Regulatory T Cells in the Colon

Margherita T. Cantorna, Yang Ding Lin, Juhi Arora, Stephanie Bora, Yuan Tian, Robert G. Nichols, Andrew D. Patterson

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

The active form of vitamin D (1,25(OH)2D) suppresses experimental models of inflammatory bowel disease in part by regulating the microbiota. In this study, the role of vitamin D in the regulation of microbe induced RORγt/FoxP3+ T regulatory (reg) cells in the colon was determined. Vitamin D sufficient (D+) mice had significantly higher frequencies of FoxP3+ and RORγt/FoxP3+ T reg cells in the colon compared to vitamin D deficient (D-) mice. The higher frequency of RORγt/FoxP3+ T reg cells in D+ colon correlated with higher numbers of bacteria from the Clostridium XIVa and Bacteroides in D+ compared to D- cecum. D- mice with fewer RORγt/FoxP3+ T reg cells were significantly more susceptible to colitis than D+ mice. Transfer of the cecal bacteria from D+ or D- mice to germfree recipients phenocopied the higher numbers of RORγt/FoxP3+ cells and reduced susceptibility to colitis in D+ vs. D- recipient mice. 1,25(OH)2D treatment of the D- mice beginning at 3 weeks of age did not completely recover RORγt/FoxP3+ T reg cells or the Bacteriodes, Bacteriodes thetaiotaomicron, and Clostridium XIVa numbers to D+ values. Early vitamin D status shapes the microbiota to optimize the population of colonic RORγt/FoxP3+ T reg cells important for resistance to colitis.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Number of pages1
JournalFrontiers in immunology
Volume10
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 2019

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Microbiota
Regulatory T-Lymphocytes
Vitamin D
Colon
Colitis
Clostridium
Bacteria
Bacteroides
Cecum
Inflammatory Bowel Diseases
Theoretical Models
Population

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Immunology and Allergy
  • Immunology

Cite this

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title = "Vitamin D Regulates the Microbiota to Control the Numbers of RORγt/FoxP3+ Regulatory T Cells in the Colon",
abstract = "The active form of vitamin D (1,25(OH)2D) suppresses experimental models of inflammatory bowel disease in part by regulating the microbiota. In this study, the role of vitamin D in the regulation of microbe induced RORγt/FoxP3+ T regulatory (reg) cells in the colon was determined. Vitamin D sufficient (D+) mice had significantly higher frequencies of FoxP3+ and RORγt/FoxP3+ T reg cells in the colon compared to vitamin D deficient (D-) mice. The higher frequency of RORγt/FoxP3+ T reg cells in D+ colon correlated with higher numbers of bacteria from the Clostridium XIVa and Bacteroides in D+ compared to D- cecum. D- mice with fewer RORγt/FoxP3+ T reg cells were significantly more susceptible to colitis than D+ mice. Transfer of the cecal bacteria from D+ or D- mice to germfree recipients phenocopied the higher numbers of RORγt/FoxP3+ cells and reduced susceptibility to colitis in D+ vs. D- recipient mice. 1,25(OH)2D treatment of the D- mice beginning at 3 weeks of age did not completely recover RORγt/FoxP3+ T reg cells or the Bacteriodes, Bacteriodes thetaiotaomicron, and Clostridium XIVa numbers to D+ values. Early vitamin D status shapes the microbiota to optimize the population of colonic RORγt/FoxP3+ T reg cells important for resistance to colitis.",
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Vitamin D Regulates the Microbiota to Control the Numbers of RORγt/FoxP3+ Regulatory T Cells in the Colon. / Cantorna, Margherita T.; Lin, Yang Ding; Arora, Juhi; Bora, Stephanie; Tian, Yuan; Nichols, Robert G.; Patterson, Andrew D.

In: Frontiers in immunology, Vol. 10, 01.01.2019.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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T1 - Vitamin D Regulates the Microbiota to Control the Numbers of RORγt/FoxP3+ Regulatory T Cells in the Colon

AU - Cantorna, Margherita T.

AU - Lin, Yang Ding

AU - Arora, Juhi

AU - Bora, Stephanie

AU - Tian, Yuan

AU - Nichols, Robert G.

AU - Patterson, Andrew D.

PY - 2019/1/1

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