Vitamin D regulation of immune function in the gut: Why do T cells have vitamin D receptors?

Jot Hui Ooi, Jing Chen, Margherita Teresa-Anna Cantorna

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

56 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Low vitamin D status is associated with an increased risk of immune-mediated diseases like inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) in humans. Experimentally vitamin D status is a factor that shapes the immune response. Animals that are either vitamin D deficient or vitamin D receptor (VDR) deficient are prone to develop IBD. Conventional T cells develop normally in VDR knockout (KO) mice but over-produce IFN-γ and IL-17. Naturally occurring FoxP3+ regulatory T cells are present in normal numbers in VDR KO mice and function as well as wildtype T regs. Vitamin D and the VDR are required for the development and function of two regulatory populations of T cells that require non-classical MHC class 1 for development. The two vitamin D dependent cell types are the iNKT cells and CD4/CD8αα intraepithelial lymphocytes (IEL). Protective immune responses that depend on iNKT cells or CD8αα IEL are therefore impaired in the vitamin D or VDR deficient host and the mice are more susceptible to immune-mediated diseases in the gut.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)77-82
Number of pages6
JournalMolecular Aspects of Medicine
Volume33
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Feb 1 2012

Fingerprint

Calcitriol Receptors
T-cells
Vitamin D
T-Lymphocytes
Natural Killer T-Cells
Lymphocytes
Immune System Diseases
Regulatory T-Lymphocytes
Inflammatory Bowel Diseases
Knockout Mice
Interleukin-17
Immunologic Factors
Animals
Population

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Biochemistry
  • Molecular Medicine
  • Molecular Biology
  • Clinical Biochemistry

Cite this

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abstract = "Low vitamin D status is associated with an increased risk of immune-mediated diseases like inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) in humans. Experimentally vitamin D status is a factor that shapes the immune response. Animals that are either vitamin D deficient or vitamin D receptor (VDR) deficient are prone to develop IBD. Conventional T cells develop normally in VDR knockout (KO) mice but over-produce IFN-γ and IL-17. Naturally occurring FoxP3+ regulatory T cells are present in normal numbers in VDR KO mice and function as well as wildtype T regs. Vitamin D and the VDR are required for the development and function of two regulatory populations of T cells that require non-classical MHC class 1 for development. The two vitamin D dependent cell types are the iNKT cells and CD4/CD8αα intraepithelial lymphocytes (IEL). Protective immune responses that depend on iNKT cells or CD8αα IEL are therefore impaired in the vitamin D or VDR deficient host and the mice are more susceptible to immune-mediated diseases in the gut.",
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Vitamin D regulation of immune function in the gut : Why do T cells have vitamin D receptors? / Ooi, Jot Hui; Chen, Jing; Cantorna, Margherita Teresa-Anna.

In: Molecular Aspects of Medicine, Vol. 33, No. 1, 01.02.2012, p. 77-82.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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