Volatile chemical cues guide host location and host selection by parasitic plants

Justin B. Runyon, Mark C. Mescher, Consuelo M. De Moraes

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

199 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

The importance of plant volatiles in mediating interactions between plant species is much debated. Here, we demonstrate that the parasitic plant Cuscuta pentagona (dodder) uses volatile cues for host location. Cuscuta pentagona seedlings exhibit directed growth toward nearby tomato plants (Lycopersicon esculentum) and toward extracted tomato-plant volatiles presented in the absence of other cues. Impatiens (Impatiens wallerana) and wheat plants (Triticum aestivum) also elicit directed growth. Moreover, seedlings can distinguish tomato and wheat volatiles and preferentially grow toward the former. Several individual compounds from tomato and wheat elicit directed growth by C. pentagona, whereas one compound from wheat is repellent. These findings provide compelling evidence that volatiles mediate important ecological interactions among plant species.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1964-1967
Number of pages4
JournalScience
Volume313
Issue number5795
DOIs
StatePublished - Sep 29 2006

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Cues
Lycopersicon esculentum
Cuscuta
Triticum
Impatiens
Seedlings
Growth

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • General

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Runyon, Justin B. ; Mescher, Mark C. ; De Moraes, Consuelo M. / Volatile chemical cues guide host location and host selection by parasitic plants. In: Science. 2006 ; Vol. 313, No. 5795. pp. 1964-1967.
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Runyon, JB, Mescher, MC & De Moraes, CM 2006, 'Volatile chemical cues guide host location and host selection by parasitic plants', Science, vol. 313, no. 5795, pp. 1964-1967. https://doi.org/10.1126/science.1131371

Volatile chemical cues guide host location and host selection by parasitic plants. / Runyon, Justin B.; Mescher, Mark C.; De Moraes, Consuelo M.

In: Science, Vol. 313, No. 5795, 29.09.2006, p. 1964-1967.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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