Waging Hospitality: Feminist Geopolitics and Tourism in West Belfast Northern Ireland

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

15 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Many areas of Belfast were considered no-go areas, places where the police had lost jurisdiction, whilst the media designated these neighbourhoods as terrorist enclaves. The urban scars that remain after the signing of the peace agreement, have transformed these marginalised areas into places of hospitality for tourists curious about the past conflict. This paper highlights the interdependent relationship between hospitality and the development of a post-war confidence for a community that had long been stigmatised as a violent enclave. For the purpose of this paper I bring together a feminist geopolitical analysis, with its attention to daily life, with more recent feminist theories of hospitality, observant to issues of inclusiveness. A feminist analysis of this type not only reflects the complicated gender politics of West Belfast, but also exposes a "politics of hospitality" that helps reframe our understandings of security.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)779-799
Number of pages21
JournalGeopolitics
Volume18
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - Oct 1 2013

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geopolitics
enclave
politics
tourism
Tourism
gender
jurisdiction
tourist
peace
police
confidence
community
analysis
conflict

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Geography, Planning and Development
  • Political Science and International Relations

Cite this

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Waging Hospitality : Feminist Geopolitics and Tourism in West Belfast Northern Ireland. / Dowler, Lorraine.

In: Geopolitics, Vol. 18, No. 4, 01.10.2013, p. 779-799.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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