Weak correlations between hemodynamic signals and ongoing neural activity during the resting state

Aaron T. Winder, Christina Echagarruga, Qingguang Zhang, Patrick J. Drew

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

25 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Spontaneous fluctuations in hemodynamic signals in the absence of a task or overt stimulation are used to infer neural activity. We tested this coupling by simultaneously measuring neural activity and changes in cerebral blood volume (CBV) in the somatosensory cortex of awake, head-fixed mice during periods of true rest and during whisker stimulation and volitional whisking. We found that neurovascular coupling was similar across states and that large, spontaneous CBV changes in the absence of sensory input were driven by volitional whisker and body movements. Hemodynamic signals during periods of rest were weakly correlated with neural activity. Spontaneous fluctuations in CBV and vessel diameter persisted when local neural spiking and glutamatergic input were blocked, as well as during blockade of noradrenergic receptors, suggesting a non-neuronal origin for spontaneous CBV fluctuations. Spontaneous hemodynamic signals reflect a combination of behavior, local neural activity, and putatively non-neural processes.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1761-1769
Number of pages9
JournalNature Neuroscience
Volume20
Issue number12
DOIs
StatePublished - Dec 1 2017

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Hemodynamics
Vibrissae
Somatosensory Cortex
Blood Vessels
Head
Cerebral Blood Volume

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Neuroscience(all)

Cite this

Winder, Aaron T. ; Echagarruga, Christina ; Zhang, Qingguang ; Drew, Patrick J. / Weak correlations between hemodynamic signals and ongoing neural activity during the resting state. In: Nature Neuroscience. 2017 ; Vol. 20, No. 12. pp. 1761-1769.
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Weak correlations between hemodynamic signals and ongoing neural activity during the resting state. / Winder, Aaron T.; Echagarruga, Christina; Zhang, Qingguang; Drew, Patrick J.

In: Nature Neuroscience, Vol. 20, No. 12, 01.12.2017, p. 1761-1769.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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