Wearable technology in service delivery processes: The gender-moderated technology objectification effect

Laurie Wu, Alei Aileen Fan, Anna S. Mattila

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

23 Scopus citations

Abstract

In the current research, we investigate how employees' adoption of wearable technology (i.e., a front-line employee using Google Glass for a hotel check-in) influences consumers' service encounter evaluations and revisit intentions. Building on the theoretical frameworks of technology objectification effect, person sensitivity bias and gender stereotypes, we find that wearable technology has a differential impact on service evaluations based on the employee's gender. Study 1 demonstrates that for female employees, the adoption of wearable technology leads to more favorable customer evaluations in service failure encounters. Study 2 shows that for male employees, the adoption of wearable technology leads to less favorable customer evaluations in service success encounters. We discuss theoretical and managerial implications of these findings.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1-7
Number of pages7
JournalInternational Journal of Hospitality Management
Volume51
DOIs
StatePublished - Oct 1 2015

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Tourism, Leisure and Hospitality Management
  • Strategy and Management

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