Weatherproofing supply chains: Enable intelligent preparedness with data analytics

John J. Coyle, Kusumal Ruamsook, Eric J. Symon

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

1 Citation (Scopus)

Abstract

Catastrophic events, occurrences of severe weather, and year-over-year changes in the weather pose various degrees of risks for companies and their supply chains. These risks range from severe, prolonged supply chain disruptions, to critical stockouts, and to escalating costs due to last-minute implementation of the emergency procedures. When these risks come to fruition, the financial impacts can easily reach millions of dollars or more. This study introduces a new concept of intelligent preparedness-preparedness based on the ability to sense, capture, and analyze weather data and turn it into actionable insights. The fundamental difference between conventional preparedness and intelligent preparedness lies in the way in which weather big data are leveraged (or lack thereof) in managing weather-related risks. A case example of an early implementer is presented to illustrate the important role that data analytics play in enabling managers to take advantage of the weather big data in effectuating intelligent preparedness.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)190-207
Number of pages18
JournalTransportation Journal
Volume55
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - Mar 1 2016

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Supply chains
supply
dollar
Managers
manager
event
lack
ability
costs
Costs
Industry
Big data

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Transportation

Cite this

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Weatherproofing supply chains : Enable intelligent preparedness with data analytics. / Coyle, John J.; Ruamsook, Kusumal; Symon, Eric J.

In: Transportation Journal, Vol. 55, No. 2, 01.03.2016, p. 190-207.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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