Weblogs, traditional sources online and political participation: An assessment of how the internet is changing the political environment

Homero Gil De Zúñiga, Eulàlia Puig-I-Abril, Hernando Rojas

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

239 Scopus citations

Abstract

Research has shown consistently that news consumption both online and offline is related positively to interpersonal discussion, political involvement and political engagement. However, little consideration has been given to the role that new sources of information may exert on different forms of political engagement. Based on secondary analysis of data collected by the Pew Internet & American Life Project, this article contrasts the influence of traditional sources of information online with that of emergent sources (blogs) in predicting further political discussion, campaigning and participation in both the online and the offline domains. The results show that the use of traditional sources online is related positively to different types of political engagement, both online and offline. Most interestingly, the article finds that blog use emerges as an equally important predictor of political engagement in the online domain. Its analyses provide support for the contention that asserts the democratic potential of the internet.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)553-574
Number of pages22
JournalNew Media and Society
Volume11
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - Jun 2009

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Communication
  • Sociology and Political Science

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