Weed management in glyphosate resistant soybean: Weed emergence patterns in relation to glyphosate treatment timing

Kari L. Hilgenfeld, Alex R. Martin, David A. Mortensen, Stephen C. Mason

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

20 Scopus citations

Abstract

Knowing when weed species are likely to emerge can aid in developing effective integrated weed management programs. When using nonresidual herbicides such as glyphosate for weed control, treatment timing is critical. This study characterized the emergence patterns of common lambsquarters, common sunflower, common waterhemp, eastern black nightshade, ivyleaf morningglory, shat- tercane, and woolly cupgrass in soybean, in relation to common glyphosate application timings. Approximately 90% or more of common lambsquarters, common sunflower, and common waterhemp seedlings emerged before the end of May, both in 2000 and 2001. Both ivyleaf morningglory and shattercane emerged from late April to mid-August, allowing these species to avoid glyphosate applications timed to prevent early-season weed competition. Avoidance through periodicity in emergence underscores the importance of integrating multiple tactics to ensure that difficult to manage weeds are not selected for in this management system.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)277-283
Number of pages7
JournalWeed Technology
Volume18
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - Apr 1 2004

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Agronomy and Crop Science
  • Plant Science

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