Weight-based discrimination and medication adherence among low-income African Americans with hypertension: How much of the association is mediated by self-efficacy?

Michael P. Richardson, Molly E. Waring, Monica L. Wang, Lisa Nobel, Yendelela Cuffee, Sharina D. Person, Sandral Hullett, Catarina I. Kiefe, Jeroan J. Allison

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

6 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Objectives: Much of the excessive morbidity and mortality from cardiovascular disease among African Americans results from low adherence to anti-hypertensive medications. Therefore, we examined the association between weight-based discrimination and medication adherence. Methods: We used cross-sectional data from low-income African Americans with hypertension. Ordinal logistic regression estimated the odds of medication non-adherence in relation to weight-based discrimination adjusted for age, sex, education, income, and weight. Results: Of all participants (n=780), the mean (SD) age was 53.7 (9.9) years and the mean (SD) weight was 210.1 (52.8) lbs. Reports of weight-based discrimination were frequent (28.2%). Weight-based discrimination (but not weight itself) was associated with medication non-adherence (OR: 1.94; 95% CI: 1.41-2.67). A substantial portion 38.9% (95% CI: 19.0%-79.0%) of the association between weight-based discrimination and medication non-adherence was mediated by medication self-efficacy. Conclusion: Self-efficacy is a potential explanatory factor for the association between reported weight-based discrimination and medication non-adherence. Future research should develop and test interventions to prevent weight-based discrimination at the societal, provider, and institutional levels.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)162-168
Number of pages7
JournalEthnicity and Disease
Volume24
Issue number2
StatePublished - Jan 1 2014

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Medication Adherence
Self Efficacy
African Americans
Hypertension
Weights and Measures
Ageism
Sex Education
Antihypertensive Agents
Cardiovascular Diseases
Logistic Models
Morbidity

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Epidemiology

Cite this

Richardson, Michael P. ; Waring, Molly E. ; Wang, Monica L. ; Nobel, Lisa ; Cuffee, Yendelela ; Person, Sharina D. ; Hullett, Sandral ; Kiefe, Catarina I. ; Allison, Jeroan J. / Weight-based discrimination and medication adherence among low-income African Americans with hypertension : How much of the association is mediated by self-efficacy?. In: Ethnicity and Disease. 2014 ; Vol. 24, No. 2. pp. 162-168.
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abstract = "Objectives: Much of the excessive morbidity and mortality from cardiovascular disease among African Americans results from low adherence to anti-hypertensive medications. Therefore, we examined the association between weight-based discrimination and medication adherence. Methods: We used cross-sectional data from low-income African Americans with hypertension. Ordinal logistic regression estimated the odds of medication non-adherence in relation to weight-based discrimination adjusted for age, sex, education, income, and weight. Results: Of all participants (n=780), the mean (SD) age was 53.7 (9.9) years and the mean (SD) weight was 210.1 (52.8) lbs. Reports of weight-based discrimination were frequent (28.2{\%}). Weight-based discrimination (but not weight itself) was associated with medication non-adherence (OR: 1.94; 95{\%} CI: 1.41-2.67). A substantial portion 38.9{\%} (95{\%} CI: 19.0{\%}-79.0{\%}) of the association between weight-based discrimination and medication non-adherence was mediated by medication self-efficacy. Conclusion: Self-efficacy is a potential explanatory factor for the association between reported weight-based discrimination and medication non-adherence. Future research should develop and test interventions to prevent weight-based discrimination at the societal, provider, and institutional levels.",
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Richardson, MP, Waring, ME, Wang, ML, Nobel, L, Cuffee, Y, Person, SD, Hullett, S, Kiefe, CI & Allison, JJ 2014, 'Weight-based discrimination and medication adherence among low-income African Americans with hypertension: How much of the association is mediated by self-efficacy?', Ethnicity and Disease, vol. 24, no. 2, pp. 162-168.

Weight-based discrimination and medication adherence among low-income African Americans with hypertension : How much of the association is mediated by self-efficacy? / Richardson, Michael P.; Waring, Molly E.; Wang, Monica L.; Nobel, Lisa; Cuffee, Yendelela; Person, Sharina D.; Hullett, Sandral; Kiefe, Catarina I.; Allison, Jeroan J.

In: Ethnicity and Disease, Vol. 24, No. 2, 01.01.2014, p. 162-168.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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T1 - Weight-based discrimination and medication adherence among low-income African Americans with hypertension

T2 - How much of the association is mediated by self-efficacy?

AU - Richardson, Michael P.

AU - Waring, Molly E.

AU - Wang, Monica L.

AU - Nobel, Lisa

AU - Cuffee, Yendelela

AU - Person, Sharina D.

AU - Hullett, Sandral

AU - Kiefe, Catarina I.

AU - Allison, Jeroan J.

PY - 2014/1/1

Y1 - 2014/1/1

N2 - Objectives: Much of the excessive morbidity and mortality from cardiovascular disease among African Americans results from low adherence to anti-hypertensive medications. Therefore, we examined the association between weight-based discrimination and medication adherence. Methods: We used cross-sectional data from low-income African Americans with hypertension. Ordinal logistic regression estimated the odds of medication non-adherence in relation to weight-based discrimination adjusted for age, sex, education, income, and weight. Results: Of all participants (n=780), the mean (SD) age was 53.7 (9.9) years and the mean (SD) weight was 210.1 (52.8) lbs. Reports of weight-based discrimination were frequent (28.2%). Weight-based discrimination (but not weight itself) was associated with medication non-adherence (OR: 1.94; 95% CI: 1.41-2.67). A substantial portion 38.9% (95% CI: 19.0%-79.0%) of the association between weight-based discrimination and medication non-adherence was mediated by medication self-efficacy. Conclusion: Self-efficacy is a potential explanatory factor for the association between reported weight-based discrimination and medication non-adherence. Future research should develop and test interventions to prevent weight-based discrimination at the societal, provider, and institutional levels.

AB - Objectives: Much of the excessive morbidity and mortality from cardiovascular disease among African Americans results from low adherence to anti-hypertensive medications. Therefore, we examined the association between weight-based discrimination and medication adherence. Methods: We used cross-sectional data from low-income African Americans with hypertension. Ordinal logistic regression estimated the odds of medication non-adherence in relation to weight-based discrimination adjusted for age, sex, education, income, and weight. Results: Of all participants (n=780), the mean (SD) age was 53.7 (9.9) years and the mean (SD) weight was 210.1 (52.8) lbs. Reports of weight-based discrimination were frequent (28.2%). Weight-based discrimination (but not weight itself) was associated with medication non-adherence (OR: 1.94; 95% CI: 1.41-2.67). A substantial portion 38.9% (95% CI: 19.0%-79.0%) of the association between weight-based discrimination and medication non-adherence was mediated by medication self-efficacy. Conclusion: Self-efficacy is a potential explanatory factor for the association between reported weight-based discrimination and medication non-adherence. Future research should develop and test interventions to prevent weight-based discrimination at the societal, provider, and institutional levels.

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