Weight control and prevention of metabolic syndrome by green tea

Sudathip Sae-Tan, Kimberly A. Grove, Joshua D. Lambert

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

115 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Green tea (Camellia sinensis, Theaceace) is the second most popular beverage in the world and has been extensively studied for its putative disease preventive effects. Green tea is characterized by the presence of a high concentrations of polyphenolic compounds known as catechins, with (-)-epigallocatechin-3-gallate (EGCG) being the most abundant and most well-studied. Metabolic syndrome (MetS) is a complex condition that is defined by the presence of elevated waist circumference, dysglycemia, elevated blood pressure, decrease serum high-density lipoprotein-associated cholesterol, and increased serum triglycerides. Studies in both in vitro and laboratory animal models have examined the preventive effects of green tea and EGCG against the symptoms of MetS. Overall, the results of these studies have been promising and demonstrate that green tea and EGCG have preventive effects in both genetic and dietary models of obesity, insulin resistance, hypertension, and hypercholesterolemia. Various mechanisms have been proposed based on these studies and include: modulation of dietary fat absorption and metabolism, increased glucose utilization, decreased de novo lipogenesis, enhanced vascular responsiveness, and antioxidative effects. In the present review, we discuss the current state of the science with regard to laboratory studies on green tea and MetS. We attempt to critically evaluate the available data and point out areas for future research. Although there is a considerable amount of data available, questions remain in terms of the primary mechanism(s) of action, the dose-response relationships involved, and the best way to translate the results to human intervention studies.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)146-154
Number of pages9
JournalPharmacological Research
Volume64
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - Aug 1 2011

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Camellia sinensis
Weights and Measures
Lipogenesis
Catechin
Dietary Fats
Genetic Models
Beverages
Waist Circumference
Hypercholesterolemia
Serum
HDL Cholesterol
Blood Vessels
Insulin Resistance
Triglycerides
Animal Models
Obesity
Blood Pressure
Hypertension
Glucose
epigallocatechin gallate

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Pharmacology

Cite this

Sae-Tan, Sudathip ; Grove, Kimberly A. ; Lambert, Joshua D. / Weight control and prevention of metabolic syndrome by green tea. In: Pharmacological Research. 2011 ; Vol. 64, No. 2. pp. 146-154.
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Weight control and prevention of metabolic syndrome by green tea. / Sae-Tan, Sudathip; Grove, Kimberly A.; Lambert, Joshua D.

In: Pharmacological Research, Vol. 64, No. 2, 01.08.2011, p. 146-154.

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

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