Well-being affects changes in perceptual speed in advanced old age: Longitudinal evidence for a dynamic link.

Denis Gerstorf, Martin Lövdén, Christina Röcke, Jacqui Smith, Ulman Lindenberger

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

60 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

This study examined competing hypotheses about dynamic cross-domain associations between perceptual speed and well-being in advanced old age. We applied the bivariate dual change score model (J. J. McArdle & F. Hamagami, 2001) to 13-year incomplete longitudinal data from the Berlin Aging Study (P. B. Baltes & K. U. Mayer, 1999; N = 516, 70-103 years at T1, M = 85 years). Reports of well-being were found to influence subsequent decline in perceptual speed (time lags of 2 years). No evidence was found for a directed effect in the other direction. None of the potential covariates examined (initial health constraints, personality, and social participation) accounted for these differential lead-lag associations. Our results suggest that well-being is not only a consequence of but also a source for successful aging. The discussion focuses on conceptual implications and methodological considerations.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)705-718
Number of pages14
JournalDevelopmental psychology
Volume43
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - May 1 2007

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Social Participation
Berlin
old age
Personality
well-being
Health
evidence
social participation
personality
health
Direction compound
Lead

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Demography
  • Developmental and Educational Psychology
  • Life-span and Life-course Studies

Cite this

Gerstorf, Denis ; Lövdén, Martin ; Röcke, Christina ; Smith, Jacqui ; Lindenberger, Ulman. / Well-being affects changes in perceptual speed in advanced old age : Longitudinal evidence for a dynamic link. In: Developmental psychology. 2007 ; Vol. 43, No. 3. pp. 705-718.
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Well-being affects changes in perceptual speed in advanced old age : Longitudinal evidence for a dynamic link. / Gerstorf, Denis; Lövdén, Martin; Röcke, Christina; Smith, Jacqui; Lindenberger, Ulman.

In: Developmental psychology, Vol. 43, No. 3, 01.05.2007, p. 705-718.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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