What Does It Mean to Deliberate? An Interpretative Account of Jurors' Expressed Deliberative Rules and Premises

Leah Sprain, John W. Gastil

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

4 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

To advance deliberative theory and practice, this study considers the experiences of trial jurors who engaged in deliberation. Conceptualized as a speech event, this article inductively explores the deliberative rules and premises articulated by jurors. Jurors believe deliberation should be rigorous and democratic, including speaking opportunities for all, open-minded consideration of different views, and respectful listening. Jurors actively consider information, but face-to-face deliberation is essential for thoroughly processing evidence. Although emotions should not influence the final verdict, participants report that emotions often reinforce deliberative norms. These results inform theory and deliberative experiences in and beyond the jury.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)151-171
Number of pages21
JournalCommunication Quarterly
Volume61
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - Apr 1 2013

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deliberation
emotion
Processing
speaking
experience
event
evidence

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Communication

Cite this

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What Does It Mean to Deliberate? An Interpretative Account of Jurors' Expressed Deliberative Rules and Premises. / Sprain, Leah; Gastil, John W.

In: Communication Quarterly, Vol. 61, No. 2, 01.04.2013, p. 151-171.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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