What Is Reasonable Suspicion of Child Abuse?

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

3 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

This study examined how Pennsylvania pediatricians characterized reasonable suspicion of child abuse, using their own words in open-ended queries. Content analysis and an iterative process identified themes, which then served as the dependent variable for analysis. 1,249 pediatricians returned the survey (61% response rate), of whom 1,012 answered the open-ended question (49% response rate). Content analysis identified 4 distinct theme categories and significant correlations with age, gender, frequency of reporting, prior education, and current position, but not expertise with child abuse or board certification. These findings add new, qualitative data to arguments for re-examining the threshold for mandated reporting.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)569-589
Number of pages21
JournalJournal of Public Child Welfare
Volume6
Issue number5
DOIs
StatePublished - Nov 1 2012

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abuse of children
Child Abuse
content analysis
Certification
certification
expertise
abuse
Education
gender
education
Pediatricians
Surveys and Questionnaires

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Developmental and Educational Psychology
  • Sociology and Political Science

Cite this

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title = "What Is Reasonable Suspicion of Child Abuse?",
abstract = "This study examined how Pennsylvania pediatricians characterized reasonable suspicion of child abuse, using their own words in open-ended queries. Content analysis and an iterative process identified themes, which then served as the dependent variable for analysis. 1,249 pediatricians returned the survey (61{\%} response rate), of whom 1,012 answered the open-ended question (49{\%} response rate). Content analysis identified 4 distinct theme categories and significant correlations with age, gender, frequency of reporting, prior education, and current position, but not expertise with child abuse or board certification. These findings add new, qualitative data to arguments for re-examining the threshold for mandated reporting.",
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What Is Reasonable Suspicion of Child Abuse? / Levi, Benjamin; Dellasega, Cheryl; Boehmer, Sue.

In: Journal of Public Child Welfare, Vol. 6, No. 5, 01.11.2012, p. 569-589.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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