What is the optimal interval between successive home blood pressure readings using an automated oscillometric device?

Kazuo Eguchi, Sujith Kuruvilla, Gbenga Ogedegbe, William Gerin, Joseph E. Schwartz, Thomas G. Pickering

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

27 Scopus citations

Abstract

Objectives To clarify whether a shorter interval between three successive home blood pressure (HBP) readings (10 s vs. 1min) taken twice a day gives a better prediction of the average 24-h BP and better patient compliance. Design We enrolled 56 patients from a hypertension clinic (mean age: 60 ± 14 years; 54% female patients). The study consisted of three clinic visits, with two 4-week periods of self-monitoring of HBP between them, and a 24-h ambulatory BP monitoring at the second visit. Using a crossover design, with order randomized, the oscillometric HBP device (HEM-5001) could be programmed to take three consecutive readings at either 10-s or 1-min intervals, each of which was done for 4 weeks. Patients were asked to measure three HBP readings in the morning and evening. All the readings were stored in the memory of the monitors. Results The analyses were performed using the second -third HBP readings. The average systolic BP/diastolic BPfor the 10-s and 1-min intervals at home were 136.1± 15.8/77.5 ± 9.5 and 133.2 ± 15.5/76.9 ± 9.3 mmHg (P = 0.001/0.19 for the differences in systolic BP and diastolic BP), respectively. The 1-min BP readings were significantly closer to the average of awake ambulatory BP (131 ± 14/79 ± 10 mmHg) than the 10-s interval readings. There was no significant difference in patients' compliance in taking adequate numbers of readings at the different time intervals. Conclusion The 1-min interval between HBP readings gave a closer agreement with the daytime average BP than the 10-s interval.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1172-1177
Number of pages6
JournalJournal of hypertension
Volume27
Issue number6
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Jun 1 2009

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All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Internal Medicine
  • Physiology
  • Cardiology and Cardiovascular Medicine

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