What makes a message real? The effects of perceived realism of alcohol- and drug-related messages on personal probability estimation.

Hyunyi Cho, Lijiang Shen, Kari M. Wilson

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

2 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Perceived lack of realism in alcohol advertising messages promising positive outcomes and antialcohol and antidrug messages portraying negative outcomes of alcohol consumption has been a cause for public health concern. This study examined the effects of perceived realism dimensions on personal probability estimation through identification and message minimization. Data collected from college students in U.S. Midwest in 2010 (N = 315) were analyzed with multilevel structural equation modeling. Plausibility and narrative consistency mitigated message minimization, but they did not influence identification. Factuality and perceptual quality influenced both message minimization and identification, but their effects were smaller than those of typicality. Typicality was the strongest predictor of probability estimation. Implications of the results and suggestions for future research are provided.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)323-331
Number of pages9
JournalUnknown Journal
Volume48
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 2013

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realism
Midwestern United States
alcohol
Alcohols
drug
Alcohol Drinking
Pharmaceutical Preparations
Public Health
Students
alcohol consumption
public health
narrative
cause
lack
student

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Health(social science)
  • Medicine (miscellaneous)
  • Public Health, Environmental and Occupational Health
  • Psychiatry and Mental health

Cite this

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What makes a message real? The effects of perceived realism of alcohol- and drug-related messages on personal probability estimation. / Cho, Hyunyi; Shen, Lijiang; Wilson, Kari M.

In: Unknown Journal, Vol. 48, No. 4, 01.01.2013, p. 323-331.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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