What to do about pertussis vaccines? Linking what we know about pertussis vaccine effectiveness, immunology and disease transmission to create a better vaccine

Shelly Bolotin, Eric Thomas Harvill, Natasha S. Crowcroft

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

17 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Pertussis (whooping cough) is a respiratory disease caused by the bacterium Bordetella pertussis. Despite the implementation of immunization programs and high vaccine coverage in most jurisdictions, pertussis is still one of the most common vaccine-preventable diseases, suggesting that the current vaccines and immunization schedules have not been sufficiently effective. Several factors are thought to contribute to this. The acellular pertussis vaccine that has been used in many jurisdictions since the 1990s is less effective than the previously used whole-cell vaccine, with immunity waning over time. Both whole-cell and acellular pertussis vaccines are effective at reducing disease severity but not transmission, resulting in outbreaks in vaccinated cohorts. In this review, we discuss various limitations of the current approaches to protection from pertussis and outline various options for reducing the burden of pertussis on a population level.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)ftv057
JournalPathogens and disease
Volume73
Issue number8
DOIs
StatePublished - Nov 1 2015

Fingerprint

Pertussis Vaccine
Whooping Cough
Allergy and Immunology
Vaccines
Acellular Vaccines
Immunization Schedule
Bordetella pertussis
Immunization Programs
Disease Outbreaks
Immunity
Bacteria
Population

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Immunology and Allergy
  • Immunology and Microbiology(all)
  • Microbiology (medical)
  • Infectious Diseases

Cite this

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What to do about pertussis vaccines? Linking what we know about pertussis vaccine effectiveness, immunology and disease transmission to create a better vaccine. / Bolotin, Shelly; Harvill, Eric Thomas; Crowcroft, Natasha S.

In: Pathogens and disease, Vol. 73, No. 8, 01.11.2015, p. ftv057.

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

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