When consumers penalize not so green products

Jeonggyu Lee, Siddharth Bhatt, Rajneesh Suri

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

2 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

To cash in on consumers’ willingness to pay higher prices for green products, several companies are promoting conventional products as green by highlighting a few green attributes. Through a theoretical lens, the authors investigate how consumers perceive such attempts. This research illustrates that not so green products make consumers sensitive to the monetary sacrifice associated with the purchase of such products. The current research shows that consumers have a negative attitude toward such products and they become concerned about the ethicality of the company when they encounter such products. Both implicit and explicit measures suggest that consumers notice the company's motive behind such practices which, in turn, impacts their price perceptions.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)36-46
Number of pages11
JournalPsychology and Marketing
Volume35
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 2018

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Research
Lenses
Green product
Purchase
Cash
Price perception
Willingness-to-pay

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Applied Psychology
  • Marketing

Cite this

Lee, Jeonggyu ; Bhatt, Siddharth ; Suri, Rajneesh. / When consumers penalize not so green products. In: Psychology and Marketing. 2018 ; Vol. 35, No. 1. pp. 36-46.
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When consumers penalize not so green products. / Lee, Jeonggyu; Bhatt, Siddharth; Suri, Rajneesh.

In: Psychology and Marketing, Vol. 35, No. 1, 01.2018, p. 36-46.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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