When pigs fly: Anime, auteurism, and Miyazaki's Porco Rosso

Kevin Michael Moist, Michael Bartholow

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

6 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

This article addresses Western views of the Japanese animation form known as 'anime' through an analysis of a lesser-known film by one of the most important anime filmmakers, Hayao Miyazaki. In seeking to build what scholar Thomas Lamarre refers to as a 'relational' understanding of anime, we address Miyazaki's film Porco Rosso through the lens of film studies concepts of auteur theory, and also in relation to the medium of animation. In a range of aspects, from visual approach to its deeper themes, Miyazaki's work is found to draw on a distinctive set of strategies that might be described as 'creative traditionalism'. Using Porco Rosso as a case study, our broader argument is that anime, as a form of postmodern popular culture, can be best understood in the West through a triangulation of different approaches that balance issues of form, medium, cultural context, and individual creators.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)27-42
Number of pages16
JournalAnimation
Volume2
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Dec 1 2007

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Anime
Animation
Auteur
Filmmaker
Creator
Cultural Context
Popular Culture
Traditionalism
Film Studies
Triangulation

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Visual Arts and Performing Arts

Cite this

Moist, Kevin Michael ; Bartholow, Michael. / When pigs fly : Anime, auteurism, and Miyazaki's Porco Rosso. In: Animation. 2007 ; Vol. 2, No. 1. pp. 27-42.
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When pigs fly : Anime, auteurism, and Miyazaki's Porco Rosso. / Moist, Kevin Michael; Bartholow, Michael.

In: Animation, Vol. 2, No. 1, 01.12.2007, p. 27-42.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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