When stereotypes become life threatening: Knowledge and attitudes about HIV/AIDS among older women and the health care providers who treat them

Jennifer Hillman, Molly Beiler

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingChapter

Abstract

According to the Centers for Disease Control (2005), approximately 15 percent of all new HIV/AIDS cases are among those aged 50 and older. The greatest increase in infection appears among older Black and Latino women who contract the virus through heterosexual contact. With the rapid growth of the older adult population in the next decade, it becomes critical that stereotypes regarding elderly sexuality are examined and dispelled. Older women are often subject to ageism; many health care providers fail to ask appropriate questions regarding their sexual health and remain unaware of unique age and gender specific risk factors. Stereotypes to be examined include beliefs that older women are asexual and have no need for HIV/AIDS education. Additional barriers to prevention include older women's lack of experience with condoms, culture specific factors including machismo, and stigma and discrimination toward older adults living with HIV/AIDS. This chapter will focus on knowledge and attitudes about HIV/AIDS among elderly women and health care providers, and will provide relevant clinical and public policy recommendations.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Title of host publicationPsychology of Stereotypes
PublisherNova Science Publishers, Inc.
Pages307-317
Number of pages11
ISBN (Print)9781617614637
StatePublished - Dec 1 2011

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Psychology(all)
  • Social Sciences(all)

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