Where does all the money go? Measuring effects of agricultural policy transfers on farm income: Discussion

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

David Abler discusses the determination of impact of agricultural policy transfers on farm income. One indicator of the cost effectiveness of an agricultural support program is income transfer efficiency. The gain in income by farmers or other program beneficiaries divided by the cost of the program to taxpayers and/or consumers. As an indicator of cost-effectiveness, the concept of transfer efficiency does not ask whether transferring income to farmers is desirable. Its usefulness lies in asking whether a particular policy can transfer income at the lowest cost out of the many policy options available. One suggestion for future research is to empirically examine whether these factors can explain differences in agricultural research spending across commodities. One statistic is that large family farms represented 8% of all farms in 2005 but received 58% of commodity program payments going to farms.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1302-1303
Number of pages2
JournalAmerican Journal of Agricultural Economics
Volume91
Issue number5
DOIs
StatePublished - Dec 1 2009

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farm income
agricultural policy
income
cost effectiveness
commodity programs
Cost-Benefit Analysis
farmers
family farms
farms
large farms
Costs and Cost Analysis
agricultural research
products and commodities
statistics
Policy transfer
Farm income
Agricultural policy
Farms
Income
Research

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Agricultural and Biological Sciences (miscellaneous)
  • Economics and Econometrics

Cite this

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abstract = "David Abler discusses the determination of impact of agricultural policy transfers on farm income. One indicator of the cost effectiveness of an agricultural support program is income transfer efficiency. The gain in income by farmers or other program beneficiaries divided by the cost of the program to taxpayers and/or consumers. As an indicator of cost-effectiveness, the concept of transfer efficiency does not ask whether transferring income to farmers is desirable. Its usefulness lies in asking whether a particular policy can transfer income at the lowest cost out of the many policy options available. One suggestion for future research is to empirically examine whether these factors can explain differences in agricultural research spending across commodities. One statistic is that large family farms represented 8{\%} of all farms in 2005 but received 58{\%} of commodity program payments going to farms.",
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